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Andy articles from the Times

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Emma Jean
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Re: Andy articles from the Times « Reply #45 on: January 12, 2012, 12:03 AM »
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I don't do serious Emma... By the way, do you ever do short posts?
Bet you can talk the hind legs of a donkey.

I do but why ask and risk your life? You know I'll talk you to death.

I thought this was a discussion forum though. 

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craighateslife
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Re: Andy articles from the Times « Reply #46 on: January 12, 2012, 12:26 AM »
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New Today

As a disciple of the legendary Harry Hopman, who drilled a succession of Australia’s great champions in their glory days of the 1960s, Tony Roche was asked to bring that sense of dedication and discipline into the careers of Pat Rafter, Lleyton Hewitt, Roger Federer, Chris Lewis and, most famously of all, Ivan Lendl.
Strolling through the corridors of Melbourne Park yesterday, “Rochey”, 66, stopped to express the opinion that Andy Murray had pulled off a masterstroke by persuading Lendl to take up the coaching cudgels with him. “He should derive a lot of strength from the fact that Ivan has shown the faith in him to take up the chance,” he said.
Whether Murray likes it or not — and he must have expected it — the appointment of Lendl has become the cutting edge of conversation in the build-up to the first grand-slam tournament of 2012. Theories abound as to why the British No 1 would want to bring the 51-year-old Czech on board, but one thing is certain: there is barely a person in the place who sees anything other than good coming from their association. Roche is sure of it.
“Every player is looking for the edge, the advantage that could turn out to the decisive one,” he said. “Ivan knows what it takes to turn things around and to start winning when it matters. I don’t see it being anything other than a great appointment for Andy.
“One of the biggest elements of being a successful coach is having the respect of the player and whether Ivan has coached anyone or not doesn’t matter. Andy respects Ivan for what he achieved in the game.”
It was when Roche was helping to inspire Lewis, the New Zealander, to the 1983 Wimbledon final — when he became a victim of John McEnroe — that he first received a communication from Lendl as to his availability.
Lendl wanted someone, a lefthander preferably, who could help him against McEnroe and Jimmy Connors. Within a year, the protégé had won the French Open against McEnroe from two sets to love down in a memorable final. “Of all those great times I had with Ivan, the one that stands out was the first US Open when he beat McEnroe [in straight sets in 1985] in his own backyard,” Roche said. “But I also get as much pride in him reaching two Wimbledon finals when he tried so hard to win a title no one thought he could win. I’m sure that had there been an extra week between Paris and Wimbledon [Lendl won the French title in 1986 and 1987, the two years he lost in the final at the All England] he would have been able to win both.
“We were brought up under Mr Hopman to believe in hard work, that you went out and won without doing anything fancy. I’m sure that is the message Ivan has been making to Andy.”
In the past few days, it has been possible to witness a sharpening bond between coach and charge. Murray, the No 4 seed for the Australian Open that starts on Monday, has been decisive and controlled, as well as looking as lean as one has seen him in recent months. He will compete in one further competitive match, against David Nalbandian, of Argentina, in the AAMI Classic in Kooyong tomorrow.
Murray told The Times yesterday: “I have always tried to find the best person [as his coach] and the way I play the game is a lot different to how a lot of people see the game. When I’m on the court I’m feeling something completely different to what the person who is coaching me has seen.
“That’s what it is about having a great coach, it is finding someone who can see the game through your eyes. Hopefully now I have found it because Ivan will understand a lot of the things I go through.
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scotnadian
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You (still) ain't seen nothing yet..

Re: Andy articles from the Times « Reply #47 on: January 12, 2012, 12:59 AM »
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..go on then...explain?
Buzz-kill..
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craighateslife
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Re: Andy articles from the Times « Reply #48 on: January 12, 2012, 01:01 AM »
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Buzz-kill..

Kill-buzz shocking
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scotnadian
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You (still) ain't seen nothing yet..

Re: Andy articles from the Times « Reply #49 on: January 12, 2012, 01:17 AM »
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Have got tendinitis in my shoulder - hence lack of posts recently.  Typing with one hand isn't fun!

I really can appreciate what it must have been like for Andy because I was sent to boarding school at the age of nine - although at least it wasn't in foreign country!  And I agree it must have been very hard, not only for Judy but for his Dad too (his parents were divorced and the boys lived with their father).

Very glad to hear from Boris Becker that Lendl has mellowed with age (and possibly having a wife and four daughters!).  He still looks so fierce at times. nervous
Aww.. sorry you are having pain and hope you get better soon, but glad to see you can do a wee post or two.  I always look for you when I log on. hug
Boarding school at 9.. yikes! Where and why?

I did think about Andy's dad too.. I know the boys lived with him for a bit.. but I have to say, generally speaking, mothers tend to worry about their sons more than fathers do.. and fathers tend to worry more about their daughters than mothers do (because we know we girls can take care of ourselves.. yes
I'm not worrying about Mr. Lendl looking fierce.. I kinda like it!
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scotnadian
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You (still) ain't seen nothing yet..

Re: Andy articles from the Times « Reply #50 on: January 12, 2012, 01:21 AM »
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Kill-buzz shocking
No killing allowed on this thread..... (until further orders..) secret service agent
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robbie
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Re: Andy articles from the Times « Reply #51 on: January 12, 2012, 07:06 AM »
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I do but why ask and risk your life? You know I'll talk you to death.

I thought this was a discussion forum though. 


Yep, no doubt about that but you do go off on a tangent sometimes..arf! Arf!
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blueberryhill
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Re: Andy articles from the Times « Reply #52 on: January 12, 2012, 07:10 AM »
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Andy didn't go to Barcelona at 9, more like 15.
But sorry u did Aileen and sorry about your tendinitis. I've had it in wrist and it's no fun Frown
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ChrisMac
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Re: Andy articles from the Times « Reply #53 on: January 12, 2012, 10:04 AM »
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 hug Hope it clears up soon Aileen, I had it in my elbow last year and had to have a cortisone injection that's how bad it was and I had it at least 6 months.
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michelle
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Re: Andy articles from the Times « Reply #54 on: January 12, 2012, 10:25 AM »
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Aileen hope you soon get relief. Great to see how positive Neil Harman is re the bonding of Andy with Lendl. I think the mutual respect is the key and Andy is really putting in some serious work on the practice court, also listening hard to what Lendl is saying.
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Alis
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Re: Andy articles from the Times « Reply #55 on: January 12, 2012, 12:02 PM »
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Lendl has 5 daughters Aileen!
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craighateslife
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Re: Andy articles from the Times « Reply #56 on: January 12, 2012, 01:22 PM »
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Today's New York Times
No man needs a Grand Slam title quite as much as Andy Murray, and his new coach, Ivan Lendl, was once in the same awkward position.
Murray, the moody and multitalented Scotsman, remains a supporting actor in an era full of historically strong leading men: Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic.

At age 24, the fourth-ranked Murray has reached three major singles finals but has yet to win so much as a set in any of them. Lendl was also 24 and surrounded by talent when he finally rallied to win the 1984 French Open against John McEnroe after losing his first four major finals.

“‘Groundhog Day,”’ Lendl, now 51, says of the parallels between him and Murray.

“I am going to be there to support Andy and help him achieve his goals,” Lendl added by e-mail from Melbourne, where the Australian Open begins Monday. “How we get there in terms of time, events, travel, etc., is something that we will work through together.”

Superstar tennis players often remain connected to the game in retirement — through television commentary, senior tour appearances or Davis Cup and Fed Cup captaincies — but they rarely become superstar coaches, rarely even attempt it.

They are often weary of the travel or unwilling to put their families through more extended absences. They may be resistant to defining success by someone else’s results, unimpressed by the pay packages, or they may even become victims of their would-be employers’ egos.

“Players might not want to be overshadowed by their coaches; they want somebody to take care of things,” said Bud Collins, the American tennis historian. “Neither players nor superstars of the past want to take orders.”

There have been exceptions on the men’s tour. Pancho Segura, the savvy Ecuadorian who made his name largely on the barnstorming professional circuit, coached Jimmy Connors. Tony Roche, not the greatest of the golden-age Australians but a French Open champion and marvelous doubles player, has had perhaps the most success in making the transition, coaching the No. 1 players Lendl, Patrick Rafter, Federer and Lleyton Hewitt.

Two of Lendl’s former rivals — Mats Wilander and Connors — have also made forays into coaching. Wilander worked with Marat Safin in 2001 and 2002; Connors worked for 18 months with Andy Roddick between 2006 and 2008. Wilander and Connors both struggled with the time commitment, and neither partnership produced the ultimate objective — a Grand Slam title — but Roddick credited Connors with reigniting his passion for the game and improving his suspect backhand.

“A coach by definition must be completely focused on the success of their player,” said Patrick Mouratoglou, who owns a leading tennis academy in France. “Former stars are, because of their stature and profile, constantly pulled back to their own success and ultimately centered on themselves.”

Mouratoglou is clearly hoping for an exception. He recently hired the former world No. 1 Martina Hingis to work at his academy with a promising group of young women’s players. But Mouratoglou said Hingis was acting more as a consultant.

Although both Lendl and Murray describe their arrangement as a full-time commitment, it is unclear how much Lendl will travel with Murray beyond the four Grand Slam tournaments and a few other big events. But Murray clearly views him as leader of a support team that still includes Dani Vallverdu, his close friend and hitting partner, and Jez Green, his physical trainer .

“He has been through a lot of the same things that I have been through, so I am sure he can help me mentally with certain things,” Murray told reporters last week in Brisbane, Australia, where he and Lendl started their partnership with a tournament victory.

“As players, they couldn’t be further apart,” Wilander said of Murray and Lendl in an e-mail. “Ivan liked to ‘bully’ his opponent in practice, in the locker room and eventually in matches, whereas Murray seems to pay a lot of respect to his opponent’s game, sometimes too much, and ‘feels’ them out.”

Among the commonalities that Wilander sees: “A very involved mother, and they are both as fit as they can be physically.”

Darren Cahill, a leading coach and commentator, played a significant role in Murray’s decision to hire Lendl, who won eight Grand Slam singles titles and spent 270 weeks as No. 1.

“Who knows if this will last six months or six years, but I’m confident that at the end of this that Andy is going to come out a better player for the experience,” Cahill said.

sponsored by the sportswear brand. But Cahill said he was not a candidate to coach Murray on a full-time basis because of his Adidas and television commitments.

Lendl had expressed tentative interest in working with Murray early last year and after Murray reached out to Lendl in December, Cahill said they clicked at their first formal meeting in Florida.

“They’ve been eerily similar so far to this point in their careers, and I think the personalities are quite similar in many respects as well,” Cahill said. “When we met Ivan in Miami, we probably spoke for about three hours or so. I was sitting back and listening to Ivan talk about tennis to Andy and the way he was captivating in the conversation, and the way Andy would fire away with questions about the current game, and Ivan was all over it. He was all over Rafa, all over Novak, all over Roger.

Obviously there are going to be some players out there that he hasn’t seen too often, he added, “but by and large, Andy is concerned by the top guys. Those are the ones he needs to overcome if he wants to win a major tournament.”

Lendl said his decision to coach was based on a number of factors. Four of his five daughters are now at American universities, and he thus has fewer family commitments. A back problem kept him from playing even recreational tennis for more than a decade, but he resumed in 2008 and has gradually increased his commitment after a long stretch of focusing on his golf game and those of his daughters.

Last year, he opened the Ivan Lendl International Junior Tennis Academy in Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, and the global interest generated by coaching Murray could certainly help the academy’s profile.

“All of these things are a factor for sure,” Lendl said. “But the idea of coaching really came as a result of enough people asking me if I would consider it that I finally felt that if the right situation came along, I might try it.”

Lendl, who left his native Czechoslovakia to live in the United States in 1981 and became an American citizen in 1992, was hardly known as the consummate team player in his peak years. “The guy hasn’t been good for tennis; he’s been so selfish, and he’s certainly not the kind of guy who brings out the best in others,” McEnroe once said of him in an Esquire interview.

But the men who worked most closely with Lendl the player — his longtime mentor, Wojtek Fibak, and Roche — said his trademark professionalism, tactical savvy and obsession over details that improve performance should make him a fine coach.

“He’s extremely smart, and he’s got experience, and he knows how to work hard and what to do before the important matches and tournaments,” said Fibak, a former top 10 player from Poland who advised Lendl from 1979 to 1985. “Ivan is a European, yet he has picked up and learned what America can offer at his best.”

The consensus is that what Murray needs most is to better manage the Grand Slam experience, both by conserving energy in the early rounds with more focused performances and by not succumbing to negativity in the biggest matches by, among other things, casting accusatory glances at his box.

“I think Ivan can help him understand how important body language is,” Wilander said. “That’s one of the four reasons why Andy hasn’t won yet. Federer, Nadal and Djokovic being the other three.”
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scotnadian
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Re: Andy articles from the Times « Reply #57 on: January 12, 2012, 01:37 PM »
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I was sitting back and listening to Ivan talk about tennis to Andy and the way he was captivating in the conversation, and the way Andy would fire away with questions about the current game, and Ivan was all over it. He was all over Rafa, all over Novak, all over Roger.
I can just picture Andy sitting on the edge of the sofa with his face all lit up..
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craighateslife
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Re: Andy articles from the Times « Reply #58 on: January 13, 2012, 02:10 AM »
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Andy Murray may well have to beat off the challenge of a French battalion and the attentions of Novak Djokovic, the champion and world No 1, in the semi-finals if he is to end his grand-slam tournament hoodoo over the next fortnight in the Australian Open.
The draw has pitted Murray, the world No 4, with Ryan Harrison, the 19-year-old American from Louisiana and world No 84, in the opening round, after which there is a steady list of French players who may be blocking his route, from Édouard Roger Vasselin, through Gaël Monfils and a juicy prospective quarter-final against Jo-Wilfried Tsonga.
Murray, astoundingly, has a 36-1 career record against French players.
It is the first time that Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal have been drawn in the same half of a grand-slam event since the 2005 French Open, so Murray finally avoided, pre-final, the Spaniard. Neale Fraser, the 1960 Wimbledon champion, drew his coin out of the trophy first, so that he was planted in the half along with Djokovic, who is seeking to win his third grand-slam title in succession at Melbourne Park. The Serb plays Paolo Lorenzi, of Italy, in the opening round.
Murray, in the company of Ivan Lendl, his new coach, was competing in his final warm-up match for the Open last night against David Nalbandian, of Argentina, in the AAMI Classic at Kooyong, coming after last week’s title success in Brisbane.
Heather Watson, the British No 3 who was drawn to face Maria Sharapova in the first round of last year’s US Open, meets Victoria Azarenka, the world No 3 from Belarus. Azarenka has started the year in outstanding form and was meeting Li Na, of China, in the final of the Apia International in Sydney last night.
As if to maintain the Anglo-French flavour of the draw, Elena Baltacha, the British No 1, meets Stéphanie Foretz-Gacon in the first round and has the enticing prospect of a second-round meeting with Kim Clijsters, the defending champion from Belgium.
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Aileen
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Re: Andy articles from the Times « Reply #59 on: January 13, 2012, 02:28 AM »
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Aww.. sorry you are having pain and hope you get better soon, but glad to see you can do a wee post or two.  I always look for you when I log on. hug
Boarding school at 9.. yikes! Where and why?
First, thanks for the compliment. Smile  Second, Edinburgh because my mother thought I'd get a better education at a private school - which was nonsense, we had an excellent High School locally.  Anyway I was happy there after I got over the first year of home-sickness.
 
Andy didn't go to Barcelona at 9, more like 15.
But sorry u did Aileen and sorry about your tendinitis. I've had it in wrist and it's no fun Frown
He was 14.  Doesn't matter though whether it's 9 or 14 - going away from home for the first time is still a big step.  Used to get new boarders coming in at 13/14 who cried themselves to sleep at night to begin with.

Thanks for all the commiserations about the tendinitis, girls. Smile  No it isn't fun - and I've had it four times already - elbow (twice), shoulder (once before) and, rather curiously, my thigh - so I know what I'm in for.  Hope to get some physio next week.


Anyway, re the articles - I like this bit:

In the past few days, it has been possible to witness a sharpening bond between coach and charge. Murray, the No 4 seed for the Australian Open that starts on Monday, has been decisive and controlled, as well as looking as lean as one has seen him in recent months.

Murray told The Times yesterday: “I have always tried to find the best person [as his coach] and the way I play the game is a lot different to how a lot of people see the game. When I’m on the court I’m feeling something completely different to what the person who is coaching me has seen.

“That’s what it is about having a great coach, it is finding someone who can see the game through your eyes. Hopefully now I have found it because Ivan will understand a lot of the things I go through.


But it does beg the question - why the #*@! did it take Andy so long to make up his mind?  Lendl offered him his services way back in March last year.





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