Home Search Calendar Help Login Register
Did you miss your activation email?
MurraysWorld Discussions  >  Murray Community  >  Andy Talk  >  News Articles 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 ... 229 230 231 [232] 233 234 235 ... 744 Go Down Reply
Author

News Articles

 (Read 449604 times)
flowerpower
Challenger Level
**
Posts: 1,371

Gender: Male
Location: Europe


Offline

Re: News Articles « Reply #3465 on: September 17, 2012, 07:55 PM »
Reply

http://www.scotland.gov.uk/News/Releases/2012/09/FMmeetsAndyMurray17092012

http://tennisconnected.com/home/2012/09/17/tennis-elbow-now-what/

http://www.lta.org.uk/News/2012/September/2012-09-17/Fans-show-support-for-Andy-Murray-at-Dunblane-homecoming/

http://www.theuksportsnetwork.com/is-andy-murray-maximising-his-on-court-success-on-his-social-profiles
[ Last edit by flowerpower September 17, 2012, 08:07 PM ] IP Logged
janetx
Challenger Level
**
Posts: 1,115



Re: News Articles « Reply #3466 on: September 17, 2012, 08:24 PM »
Reply

Andy and Kim at the Burberry fashion show - great pics!

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2204591/Kim-Sears-swaps-sport-style-shines-Burberry-Prorsums-LFW-Andy-Murray.html?openGraphAuthor=%2Fhome%2Fsearch.html%3Fs%3D%26authornamef%3DLouise%2BSaunders
IP Logged
TheMadHatter
World No 1
*
*
Posts: 11,886

Gender: Male
Location: Southampton


Re: News Articles « Reply #3467 on: September 17, 2012, 09:06 PM »
Reply

Poor article, written by a self-confessed Djokovic fan. He clearly tries to be balanced but he gives Murray almost no credit whatsoever, instead contributing his win to Djokovic playing badly, fifth set aside. Which is nonsense. Djokovic was poor for four games in the 2nd set but he was playing well for the rest of those two sets which Andy won. Typical fan nonsense, something we would say when Andy loses, moaning about playing poor and perhaps exaggerating somewhat rather than giving credit where it's due.
IP Logged
Aileen
Murraymaniac
**********
Posts: 35,558

Gender: Female
Location: Edinburgh


Re: News Articles « Reply #3468 on: September 18, 2012, 12:42 AM »
Reply

I wondered when those two were going to meet.  Let's hope Salmond keeps his promise about helping the Murrays establish a tennis academy and that this isn't just a piece of political engineering to help his independence campaign. Rolling Eyes
IP Logged
ChrisMac
World No 1
*******
Posts: 11,949

Gender: Female


Re: News Articles « Reply #3469 on: September 18, 2012, 09:53 AM »
Reply

    naughty    Now, now Aileen, have a little faith!
IP Logged
Aileen
Murraymaniac
**********
Posts: 35,558

Gender: Female
Location: Edinburgh


Re: News Articles « Reply #3470 on: September 18, 2012, 04:00 PM »
Reply

I don't entirely trust Salmond when it comes to independence.  He isn't nicknamed "Slippery" for nothing!
IP Logged
backhandslice
Seed
****
Posts: 4,383

Gender: Male
Location: Glasgow


You love my shenanigans. Admit it.

Re: News Articles « Reply #3471 on: September 18, 2012, 04:35 PM »
Reply

Just wanted to say  (yet again)  thank you for reading my article.  Its became quite a hit  LOL  Very Happy   29 facebook shares  and 2 twitter shares   yay Very Happy     I really don't think it's my best work tbh.  I think I can improve on so much.     

here are just some of the comments I got on my article  Very Happy  wow.  So many nice people in  this world

1) "Just want to say your article is as amazing. The clarity on your post is simply excellent and that i can assume you are a professional in this subject. Well with your permission allow me to snatch your feed to stay up to date with drawing close post. Thank you a million and please continue the enjoyable work."

2) "You’re actually a just right webmaster. The website loading speed is amazing. It sort of feels that you are doing any distinctive trick. In addition, The contents are masterwork. you have performed a fantastic task in this subject!"


"Webmaster "   Very Happy  lol.   I did not expect this at all. 
IP Logged
scotjules
Satellite Level
**
Posts: 235

Gender: Female
Location: Scotland


Re: News Articles « Reply #3472 on: September 18, 2012, 04:42 PM »
Reply

That's great John. I really enjoyed your article, been meaning to say so in this thread. Hope this encourages you to write more!
IP Logged
Alis
ATP Level
***
Posts: 2,855

Gender: Female
Location: Southern Hebrides

Re: News Articles « Reply #3473 on: September 18, 2012, 06:51 PM »
Reply

A lot of space has been given in the Scottish press today to Andy's push to establish a tennis academy in Scotland - partly funded by him - it made the front page of several dailies.  A site just outside Edinburgh has been earmarked - really hope he makes it happen.
[ Last edit by Alis September 18, 2012, 08:56 PM ] IP Logged
Littlebuddha
Seed
****
Posts: 3,638


Re: News Articles « Reply #3474 on: September 18, 2012, 07:36 PM »
Reply

Yes would'nt it be great if Scotland had its own tennis academy it would help nurture the talent we have here.
I know there are some covered courts in Stirling but not many. If Andy is willing to contribute some money towards it it would be great I know they have been in discussions with Alex Salmond. Just look at how many kids are interested in the game because of Andy. He is a great ambassador for the game.
IP Logged
teejay1
Top Seed
*****
Posts: 6,031



Courage doesn't always roar - but wins Wimbledon

Re: News Articles « Reply #3475 on: September 18, 2012, 10:38 PM »
Reply

Hi All,

It would be brilliant for Scotland to have its own tennis academy. Andy's triumph, and the reaction to it, could inspire a lot of youngsters to have a go at tennis, which could lead to some coming through who have potential. Obviously a system needs to be in place to deal with kids coming through, and an academy sounds like a great idea.

I have always thought Andy was the ideal player to get kids in to the game. He's always been so exciting to watch, and so competitive, as well as being down to earth. Kids would just love him.

Looking ahead to the future, I love the idea of GB having another slam winner one day, someone who says in an interview, 'I was inspired to take up the game when I watched Andy Murray win the US Open for the first time in 2012'.

IP Logged
xxdanixx
Seed
****
Posts: 3,939

Gender: Female
Location: Ireland


Dream big, because little dreams have little magic

Re: News Articles « Reply #3476 on: September 18, 2012, 11:07 PM »
Reply

http://msn.foxsports.com/tennis/story/roger-federer-novak-djokovic-rafael-nadal-paying-price-for-success-091812


Success taking a toll on top stars

 Roger Federer says he's "wounded" and does not know how much more he will play this year. Rafael Nadal's knees have ruined the second half of his year. Novak Djokovic's legs went at the end of that five-set marathon in the US Open final.

Which leaves Andy Murray as the last man standing.

Murray, or the Duke of Dunblane as we might call him now, was the junior partner in the heavy hitting quartet who have lorded over men's tennis for the past five years. Back in January, everyone was wondering whether this unprecedented dominance of four players at the top of the ranking list could survive another campaign.

 Amazingly, it did — once again, they won everything in sight — but at considerable cost. The surprise was not, perhaps, that they went on winning but that they survived the obstacle course for as long as they did. Let's take a look at what they achieved:

Djokovic began the year by defending his Australian Open crown, which culminated in the Serb playing a total of 10 hours, 3 minutes just to get through his last two matches. He needed 4 hours, 50 minutes to beat Murray in a semifinal thriller but then had to stay on court for an incredible 5 hours, 53 minutes before he could overcome Nadal in the final.

At the French Open, the weather meant that Nadal would need two days to beat Djokovic in the final. At Wimbledon, Federer got the better of Murray in four sets, the first two of which lasted 1 hour, 53 minutes. Then Murray, closing on his rivals in the home stretch, won with surprising ease against Federer in the gold-medal match at the Olympics on that same Centre Court.

And so to Flushing Meadows, where Murray became the first British male in 76 years to win a Grand Slam singles title when he defeated Djokovic over five sets.

So the honors board, including the Olympics, comes up looking like this:

Murray: Two titles, one more final
Djokovic: One title, two more finals
Nadal: One title, one more final
Federer: One title, one more final

Ten slots open for the five big finals and the top four grabbed them all. No surprise, perhaps, but for Murray to come out with the best overall record was certainly not expected. You can argue the case for the Olympics being included among the Slams on the basis that the top players now put as much effort into trying to win gold as they do one of the more traditional tennis majors, which was not the case 20 years ago.

For Murray, it certainly proved to be the stepping stone to his triumph in New York.

"It, obviously, gave me some extra confidence," he said. "It was, by far, the biggest win of my career before winning the US Open."

 The reasons why Murray was able to finish strongest in this pedigree field were numerous. Many will put his relationship with Ivan Lendl at the top of the list, and there is no doubt that the tough-talking Czech-born champion was the perfect choice as an addition to Murray's close-knit team. Lendl himself has admitted that his own history of having lost in four Slam finals before winning one helped Murray get over that particular psychological hurdle. And, technically, improvements with his second serve and the power with which he now hits his forehand proved to be crucial improvements.

Reaching the final at Wimbledon for the first time was another breakthrough, even though it ended in defeat. Previously he had been left in despair at losing finals in Australia.

"But the support I got from the fans and those close to me after losing at Wimbledon really helped me get over it quicker," Murray said. "I was able to take a lot of positives from losing in a final, which had not been the case before."

Returning to the same stage only three weeks later inspired Murray to be more aggressive. To everyone's surprise, he outplayed the great Swiss champion 6-2, 6-1, 6-4.

That provided the springboard for victory at the US Open, where he was able to withstand a Djokovic fight-back that saw the Serb win the third and fourth sets because he was equipped mentally, technically and, crucially, physically to deal with it.

Not every commentator has picked up on precisely what was happening in the first two sets. It was not a question of whether Murray was winning or losing rallies that regularly lasted more than 15 or 20 strokes — one broke some kind of a record at 54 — but how the rallies were being played out. More often than not, it was the Scot who was dictating the play from the middle of his baseline while Djokovic did the running. In the end, in those last few minutes of the match, that factor decided the outcome.

Novak's mind was still willing — "I was trying my hardest to get back from 2-4," he said — but the legs were no longer supporting his effort.

"I had trouble moving for the last couple of games," he admitted.

So all that core work Murray has done with his fitness trainer, Jez Green, and the team proved vital at the end, even though, because of the Olympics, Murray had been forced to miss his customary tune-up in Miami's sticky summer heat in July. But physical work builds up over a period of years, especially when an athlete is reaching his peak in his mid-20s, and the extra strength was there when Murray needed it most.

 That is not to say he is a stronger or better athlete than Djokovic, who is a phenomenal specimen himself. But, on this particular day, Murray was able to preserve some energy at the start when Djokovic was expending it. That was one decisive factor with the other being Murray's ability to rediscover his service rhythm which had seen him maintain an incredible first-service percentage of 80 percent in the first set. In the fifth, the first serves started finding their mark again, blocking the Serb's path to another come back after he had gone an early break down.

Perhaps the three people in the world who were least surprised at Murray's climb to the top were his three great rivals — Federer, Nadal and Djokovic. They, along with their peers in the locker room, had been saying Murray was good enough to win a Slam for years.

"He's proven it now, and he deserves to be where he is, no question about it," said Djokovic of a player he has looked upon as a friend from the moment they first played each other at the age of 11.

It remains to be seen just how big a toll this fierce competition between four of the greatest players of all time takes on the participants in a physical sense. Hopefully, Federer and Nadal will be able to climb back in the ring by the time the ATP World Finals return to London's 02 Arena in November. The year deserves a great finale with all four in fighting shape. As Djokovic said, this is a special era.

"Us four are taking this game to another level," he said. "Andy winning makes it even more competitive and more interesting for people to watch."
IP Logged
xxdanixx
Seed
****
Posts: 3,939

Gender: Female
Location: Ireland


Dream big, because little dreams have little magic

Re: News Articles « Reply #3477 on: September 18, 2012, 11:08 PM »
Reply

http://www.tennis.com/news/2012/09/muzz-understanding/39474/#.UFj2sxjYk4Q

Muzz-Understanding

Andy Murray is having his moment. Since winning the U.S. Open one week ago, he has appeared in the States on serious talk shows (Charlie Rose) and not so serious (Jimmy Fallon). He’s combed his hair for a photo shoot in Central Park, been escorted through a London airport by smiling female flight attendants, sat primly at a fashion show with Anna Wintour, and appeared, for the most part without a scowl on his face, on the front page of every newspaper in the United Kingdom. It’s amazing how much winning a single set—the fifth against Novak Djokovic in their final—can raise a man’s profile and polish his reputation. Imagine what the reaction would have been if he had lost it.

On second thought, don’t imagine it. Blowing a two-set lead in a Grand Slam final would have been, as Murray put it after the match, “a tough one to take.” Roughly translated from Murray-speak, that means it would have been the most soul-crushing defeat of his career. Instead, for the first time, the man who once couldn’t win the big one has been celebrated without reservation in his home country. And in his hometown. This weekend, the Murray moment reached its joyous peak when he returned to Dunblane and was greeted by 15,000 people who had waited in the rain for hours to cheer him. Murray, who said he “hadn’t been part of anything like this before,” has never looked as proud as he did standing, with his two Olympic medals around his neck, next to a special gold post office box that the town constructed in his honor. Even to them, the people who knew him way back when when, Muzz must have seemed like a new man.

Winning raises your profile and changes your reputation among the general public, but it can even change the perceptions of those who have followed you closely over the years. I had that sense while watching Murray’s world-record-length press conference after the final. (I don’t think I’ve ever seen a transcript that has stretched to seven pages.) That night I had written the Racquet Reaction for our website, which is done before the pressers. So I was free to watch Murray’s without having to write about it; instead of listening for specific comments that I could use in an article, I just listened. By the end, after those seven pages’ worth of words, I felt a little differently about him, or at least about the way he interacts with the media.

This was the first line that sent laughter through the room. It came after Murray said how relieved he had felt when the match was over.

Q: You just said “relief.” Is there a moment when you thought, “exultation,” too?

ANDY MURRAY: I don’t know what that means.

That turned out to the theme of the press conference. Everyone, myself included, noted that Murray didn’t smile—at least until he was asked why he wasn’t smiling. This is the Muzz way, of course. He was understated, to say the least, in his moment of triumph on court. When he walked up to accept the first Grand Slam winner’s trophy of his career, he did it with that same achy, half-hobbling gait that we know so well from his matches.

Murray is followed by more reporters, and asked more questions (in English, at least), than any other tennis player. I had thought at times that his way of answering them—unsmiling, even-keel, monotonic—was a way of keeping his distance and revealing as little as possible. If you’re going to be asked questions every day of your life, it’s better not to get too emotionally involved in them. But in the few times that I had talked to Murray one on one, I was surprised that he hadn’t seemed all that distant or guarded. (One of those interviews took place over the phone while I was walking to my tennis club; it is, admittedly, fun to tell your opponent that the person you were just chatting with on your cellphone was Andy Murray.)

In my brief conversations with him, Murray had been serious and thoughtful, and that’s how he came across in his post-final presser. He wont give you a snarky retort, like Andy Roddick; he won’t come up with a nugget of stoical philosophy, like Rafael Nadal; and he’s not as his ease the way Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer typically are after they win. (Murray can also be the master of the obvious. Referring to his tears after the match, he said, “You know, I cried a little bit on court. You’re not sad; you’re incredibly happy.”) But Murray also won’t give you a cliché if he can help it. While his words may not be clever or revelatory, he does his best to be honest and not just tell you what you want to hear.

For example:

When Murray was asked what was going through his mind when Djokovic took a medical timeout as he was getting ready to serve out the match, he said, “I thought, you know, Where are you going to serve, first point?” (As with several of his answers in this presser, this one was Lendl-esque in its tunnel-vision practicality.)

Asked whether, at the start of the fifth set, he was thinking about his previous four final-round losses in Grand Slams, Murray said, “I was thinking a bit more about what happened the last couple of sets and the situation I found myself in after nearly four hours of play...I got a bit fortunate to get the break at the beginning of the set, and that helped. I got a net cord on the slice backhand. Then I settled down a bit after that.”

Had his Olympic experience helped him, the way so many writers believed it had? Murray admitted that he wasn’t sure.

“I don’t know whether the Olympics helped me today or not....Before the match, when I was sitting in the locker room, there were still doubts. You’re still thinking, If I lose this one, you know, no one’s ever lost their first five finals. I just didn’t really want to be that person.”

Had he thought about being the first British man to win a Grand Slam since 1936? “You try not to think about it much when you’re playing,” Murray said, “but when I was serving for the match, I realized how important that moment was, for British tennis or British sport. I’m obviously proud that I managed to achieve it, and I don’t have to get asked that stupid question again.”

Finally, Murray was asked why he didn’t seem to be more excited. “It’s hard to explain,” he said, searching for the honest answer, even if it wasn’t the most crowd-pleasing. “It’s been a long, long journey to this point. So I’m just, I don’t know. I don’t know if it’s disbelief or whatever. I’m very, very happy on the inside. I’m sorry if I’m not showing it as you would like.”

That last line sounds sarcastic in print, but that’s not how Murray meant it. He was honestly sorry he couldn’t express his happiness more easily. It’s a reaction—disbelief, numbness—that I could see having myself at a moment like that. “Relief,” the primary emotion Murray said he felt at that moment, doesn’t typically lead to someone pulling his shirt off and twirling it over his head.

Tennis has a new champion in Murray, which means that his personality becomes more significant to the sport. His profile has been raised, and his reputation changed. Is it too much to ask that he becomes better known for his honesty, lack of pretension, and thoughtfulness, than for the fact that he isn’t, and will never be, Mr. Smiley?

IP Logged
Aileen
Murraymaniac
**********
Posts: 35,558

Gender: Female
Location: Edinburgh


Re: News Articles « Reply #3478 on: September 19, 2012, 12:29 AM »
Reply

Excellent articles and enjoyable reads.  Thanks. Smile

Really like Djoko's comment -
"Us four are taking this game to another level ... Andy winning makes it even more competitive and more interesting for people to watch." yay
IP Logged
Sabine
Veteran
******
Posts: 8,642

Gender: Female


^_^

Re: News Articles « Reply #3479 on: September 19, 2012, 06:57 AM »
Reply

Excellent articles and enjoyable reads.  Thanks. Smile

Really like Djoko's comment -
"Us four are taking this game to another level ... Andy winning makes it even more competitive and more interesting for people to watch." yay


Novak is a real gentleman....like him for his sportsmanship and his humour.
IP Logged
Pages: 1 ... 229 230 231 [232] 233 234 235 ... 744 Go Up Reply 
« previous next »