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News Articles

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backhandslice
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Re: News Articles « Reply #6600 on: June 23, 2013, 09:01 PM »
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lolz   

http://t.co/FaXsFBaU3K
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Katie
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Andy Murray - US Open and Wimbledon champion! :)

Re: News Articles « Reply #6601 on: June 23, 2013, 09:06 PM »
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Nadal was actually injured during that match, but Cash is just jealous because Murray will get more praise for winning then he did in his day.

Do you know what injury he had? I know people were saying he was exhausted after the Olympics but I don't remember a specific injury.
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Connor
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Re: News Articles « Reply #6602 on: June 23, 2013, 09:07 PM »
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I can relate.
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backhandslice
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Re: News Articles « Reply #6603 on: June 23, 2013, 09:09 PM »
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I can relate.

Very Happy   lol  really  ?   
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Connor
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Re: News Articles « Reply #6604 on: June 23, 2013, 09:10 PM »
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Very Happy   lol  really  ?   

I got really tipsy this past Wednesday, I kept laughing for an hour straight. I did some other strange stuff which is not for the eyes of a public forum.
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backhandslice
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You love my shenanigans. Admit it.

Re: News Articles « Reply #6605 on: June 23, 2013, 09:17 PM »
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I got really tipsy this past Wednesday, I kept laughing for an hour straight. I did some other strange stuff which is not for the eyes of a public forum.

hahahaha. 
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angiebabez
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Andy Murray Wimbledon Champion 2013

Re: News Articles « Reply #6606 on: June 23, 2013, 09:19 PM »
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I got really tipsy this past Wednesday, I kept laughing for an hour straight. I did some other strange stuff which is not for the eyes of a public forum.

Tell us tell us by pm lol
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Clydey
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Re: News Articles « Reply #6607 on: June 23, 2013, 09:55 PM »
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Nadal was actually injured during that match, but Cash is just jealous because Murray will get more praise for winning then he did in his day.

Nadal got injured when he was already down 2 sets.
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Connor
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Re: News Articles « Reply #6608 on: June 23, 2013, 09:56 PM »
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Nadal got injured when he was already down 2 sets.

Yeah, I think his knees gave way again. It affected him for much of the 2009 season too.
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IonaRed
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Re: News Articles « Reply #6609 on: June 23, 2013, 11:28 PM »
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An Andy-related extract from Pat Cash's article in the Sunday Times:

Why I back Nadal to defy this absurd seeding

"So in the last four Murray is the probable opponent and after the Scot's back injury I'm wondering if he will be sufficiently strong, physically and mentally, to last back-to-back five-set matches. The only times Murray has beaten Nadal in Grand Slam matches has been when Rafa was playing hurt: the US Open in 2008 and the Australian Open in 2010. Since the Scot reached the final of the Australian Open in January he hasn't enjoyed the greatest of years by the lofty standards we expect from him. He won the Miami Masters title in March and Queen's last week but he didn't have to beat another member of the top four to claim either trophy. To win Wimbledon I'm sure he'll have to beat two of them, back to back over the best of five sets. He has never managed that and, sadly, I'm not sure he'll do it this time."

----------

Have I missed something here, or am I right in thinking that Rafa wasn't injured at all in their US Open match that Andy won? And in their Australian Open match, didn't Rafa get injured only after Andy had a 2 set lead anyway, with Andy always looking like the likely winner.


No, you're absolutely right. Nadal wasn't injured when Andy beat him at the US Open in 08 and Rafa sustained an injury when already 2 sets down at the AO. Cash is talking absolute rubbish.
[ Last edit by IonaRed June 23, 2013, 11:48 PM ] IP Logged
xxdanixx
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Dream big, because little dreams have little magic

Re: News Articles « Reply #6610 on: June 24, 2013, 12:13 AM »
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Really good interview with Andy here-done during RG,so not totally up-to-date,but still a great read Smile

Andy Murray: I dreamt I'd won Wimbledon

"There’s a lot riding on Wimbledon, but I’m better equipped to deal with the pressures and understand how I need to play matches"


Novak Djokovic is through to the next round. Roger Federer cruises on, surrendering only 11 games in two matches. Rafa Nadal faces back-to-back matches thanks to rain delays. It is day four of the French Open and, in Paris, the tennis world is abuzz with its snakes-and-ladders business of grand slam progression, upset, ranking points, prize money and glory.
Where is Andy Murray?

The world number two – far removed from his rivals’ locker-room banter – is walking a pair of border terriers on Ockham Common in Surrey.

Having withdrawn from the French Open due to a back injury – dashing his ambition of making a fourth consecutive grand slam final – the 26-year-old Scot cuts an incongruous figure in a padded jacket, jeans and wellies, an ordinary young man spending time with girlfriend Kim Sears and their dogs, Maggie May and Rusty. In tune with the dynamic of a Murray five-set nail-biter, one minute it’s a relaxed stroll along the path, and the next he’s disappearing at speed into the heather – dodging sleepy adders and ground-nesting birds – pursuing a runaway dog.

“I love walking the dogs,” he says, once we are back in his Regency-style home-cum-fitness HQ in Oxshott, sitting in a super-tidy dining room dominated by a huge portrait of a beseeching terrier’s face. (Kim is an animal artist with her own business, Brushes and Paws.)
“I grew up around my grandparents’ retrievers and labradors,” he continues. “My parents both worked, so after school my brother and I would go round to Gran and Granpa’s house and they always had two dogs, a boy and a girl. It’s great that Kim and I are able to have two of them, too. Kim takes them out in the morning and when I’m back from training we go out again.”

The dogs are a symbol of downtime, of a happy domestic life, and also a safe outlet through which this private, unassuming couple can project personality on their own terms. Maggie May has a twitter account [@maggiemay_hem] on which she exchanges tweets with Djokovic’s poodle, Pierre, and posts pictures such as the snap of her sitting atop the postbox in Dunblane that was painted gold in honour of Murray’s Olympic success. She once slyly expressed competitive dismay at how much attention the Duchess of Cambridge’s spaniel receives.

In private, it is clear Murray is a warm-hearted individual with a great sense of humour. As the nation came to realise in those two bouts of affecting tears on Centre Court last summer – the emotional outpouring after losing to Roger Federer in the Wimbledon final and the tears of joy and relief, only weeks later, when he beat the Swiss player for Olympic glory – Murray is not so much aloof and surly as extremely focused, driven and hugely mindful of the emotions of all those who support his hunger for success.

Relaxation, beyond an athlete’s normal “rest and recovery” programme, barely features in his schedule. “When I’m travelling, I play fantasy sports because I spend so much time in hotel rooms,” he says. “And I’ll watch any sport on the TV. Before I hurt my back, I’d occasionally enjoy go-karting, or play golf and football. On flights, I go through box sets. Sherlock – that’s the best series I’ve seen for a while. Benedict Cumberbatch is SO good.
I tried the US version, Elementary, but it’s just not the same. For me, Sherlock Holmes is Benedict Cumberbatch. He’s unbelievable…”

Back in his world of training drills and ice baths, what seems most unbelievable to Murray is that the positive momentum that began with the Olympic gold medal, continued with his first grand slam title at the US Open, and took him to another final against Djokovic at the Australian Open, has been stalled by injury. As he concedes, expectation has never been higher. He will tread the grass of SW19 not just as the British number one, but as the world number two, Olympic and US Open champion. Surely this could be the year that Murray becomes the first British man to win Wimbledon since Fred Perry in 1936?

The back injury is a recurring niggle, exacerbated by the different demands made by clay-court play. Might there even be an advantage in missing the French Open if he arrives at  Wimbledon without carrying that niggle?

“Missing the French Open was really hard. I haven’t missed a slam for six years. All my training goes into being ready for the slams, but you have to try to find a positive,” he says, sounding disconsolate. “I’ll be short of match practice, but hopefully I’ll have had more time on the grass courts and have a bit of a headstart…”

The hiatus has made him even more determined in his rehabilitation work. He’s added Pilates to his routine, working on machines such as the Reformer and Cadillac, which use springs as resistance. “I work in a small class. I’ve  done big-group classes, Bikram yoga and so on, but I find Pilates helps me the most because the work can be tailored day by day.”

The body is one thing, the mind another. In the psychological warfare that is top tennis, negativity is the enemy. Those who have known Murray for years note how he has become much happier in his skin. Some credit the taciturn presence of coach Ivan Lendl. Some put it down to the maturing of a young man who burst onto the scene as a scruffy teenager when he won the US Junior Open in 2004 at the age of 17.

He has certainly always done things the hard way, but, in terms of the “monkeys on the back” that sports psychologists talk about, Murray has rid himself of two: first, by returning to Centre Court so soon after his Wimbledon final defeat and emerging the Olympic champion, and second, by joining the elite club of grand slam winners after beating Djokovic at New York’s Flushing Meadow. After losing four previous grand slam finals, Murray proved in 2012 that he is capable of performing when it matters.

“I was struggling after I’d lost at Wimbledon. It was one of the toughest matches for me to lose,” he says. Immediately after the trophy ceremony, he spoke with Lendl in the locker room. “Not about the match, more about the way I’d handled the situation and the pressure. He was really happy with how I’d dealt with all of that.”

Murray has never sat down to analyse a replay of the match. “I haven’t watched any of it. It would be a tough one for me,” he admits, though he hasn’t been able to avoid images of the championship point saved, then another lost to deny him his dream – “because, at tournaments throughout the year, they show replays of who won the last slams…”

Some players like watching their matches, some don’t, he explains. It sounds as if he’s in the latter camp. “The guys I work with watch a lot of my matches and see the things I need to work on. I played seven matches at Wimbledon, not just the final, so there will have been certain things I did well throughout the whole event and there will be other things I didn’t do so well. We go through feedback about the tournament, or even the grass-court season as a whole, as soon as we get back on the practice courts.”

The night before Murray stepped back onto a practice court after Wimbledon 2012 he dreamt he was holding the men’s singles trophy above his head in victory. “Three or four days afterwards, I woke up thinking I’d won Wimbledon. When I realised I hadn’t, that set me back again, but once I was back on the practice court I started to feel better. Something had changed. Those two weeks before the Olympics were the best I’ve ever played in practice. That was the first time that I responded really well after a painful loss.”

Looking ahead to the fortnight of strawberries and cream, he says, “There’s a lot riding on Wimbledon, but I’m better equipped to deal with the pressures and understand how
I need to play matches when I get to the latter stages of the big events. The US Open win has eased pressure on myself, definitely, because winning a grand slam was the aim behind every practice session I have ever put myself through.”

Wimbledon for Murray is Groundhog Day. Every year he finds himself repeating the same answer again and again to the same question: could this be your year? “I deal with it as best
I can, knowing that I’ve played some of my best tennis at Wimbledon over the course of my  career,” he says. “It’s the build-up that’s difficult. People follow me everywhere and there are more strains on my time. Once the tournament starts, it’s great. I try to manage my energy well and fit in the extra commitments around training, practice and rest.

“I love playing in front of the home crowd. I want to draw upon the incredible atmosphere I experienced at the Olympics. That bubble of a positive atmosphere brought out the best in athletes. And of course it’s nice to come home every night and sleep in my own bed, and have friends and family around.”

One uncertainty is whether or not his loyal and chatty grandparents will be there to cheer him on. When I tell him I have enjoyed the occasional cup of tea with his grandmother, Shirley, up in the Competitors’ Facilities terrace, he rather sweetly explains that that may not happen this year because she’s recovering from a broken hip. “She was doing the bed and tripped on the electric blanket,” he explains. “I called her before she went into surgery and asked, why in this day and age, she was still using an electric blanket and she said, ‘It’s not me, it’s your grandfather!’”

Queen’s Club is the first test for Murray, and on to Wimbledon. Given Murray’s membership of the tennis elite’s Fab Four, his anticipation suggests quiet confidence. “When the grand slams come round, people like to put question marks next to the top people. He’s struggled here, his form has dipped there, but by the end of the French Open I bet you’ll see Rafa and Novak in the semi-finals [he was right]. You expect the top players to play well at the slams.”

To that the nation’s chorus is: “We do, Andy, we do” – confident he’ll be doing his damnedest to achieve the ultimate dream.

http://www.radiotimes.com/news/2013-06-24/andy-murray-i-dreamt-id-won-wimbledon
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teejay1
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Courage doesn't always roar - but wins Wimbledon

Re: News Articles « Reply #6611 on: June 24, 2013, 12:25 AM »
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See, this is why I hate the build up to Wimbledon. Some past it former winner opens their trap and thinks they have a right to put Andy down, and they get their facts wrong.

I've only seen the 2008 USO semi on youtube, I didn't have Sky then, but no way was Nadal injured. Andy was already two sets up on Nadal in 2010 when Nadal inexplicably retired. Didn't Andy beat Nadal in 2011 in Australia too?

It's not Andy's fault he didn't have to beat Federer, Nadal or Djokovic to win Miami and Queen's. Cash manages to insult Andy there, but also Ferrer and Cilic. How rude.

I wonder if Cash is on Twitter. If he is, would one of you please tweet him and put him straight? He needs telling what utter rubbish he is spouting.
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The Gnome
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Re: News Articles « Reply #6612 on: June 24, 2013, 01:35 AM »
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These ex players really do put their foot in their mouth when they speak or make predictions, most of it based on personal bias, the only one i like is Goran, he seems to be pretty clued up, if i remember rightly he was the only ex player to predict Andy to win the USO, although i could be wrong.
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IonaRed
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Re: News Articles « Reply #6613 on: June 24, 2013, 01:58 AM »
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See, this is why I hate the build up to Wimbledon. Some past it former winner opens their trap and thinks they have a right to put Andy down, and they get their facts wrong.

I've only seen the 2008 USO semi on youtube, I didn't have Sky then, but no way was Nadal injured. Andy was already two sets up on Nadal in 2010 when Nadal inexplicably retired. Didn't Andy beat Nadal in 2011 in Australia too?

It's not Andy's fault he didn't have to beat Federer, Nadal or Djokovic to win Miami and Queen's. Cash manages to insult Andy there, but also Ferrer and Cilic. How rude.

I wonder if Cash is on Twitter. If he is, would one of you please tweet him and put him straight? He needs telling what utter rubbish he is spouting.

Cash spouts the same rubbish every year. Best not to take any notice.
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Re: News Articles « Reply #6614 on: June 24, 2013, 02:08 AM »
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Predictions from the BBC website

Sue Barker, BBC Sport presenter

I'm going for Andy Murray. I hope this isn't a poisoned chalice for him. His Grand Slam record has been outstanding and he has turned it around after losing the Wimbledon final last year. I think last year he learned a lot about himself and I hope the public really accept him now and treasure him. I feel the rest he has had and the matches he now has under his belt means he is ready

Jonathan Overend, BBC tennis correspondent

Andy Murray - He's never been in better shape ahead of Wimbledon and has been hitting with quiet confidence during his practice sessions here. The title at Queen's was an obvious boost, likewise the extra preparation time on grass having missed the French.

He won't be scared by the draw and should he make the final, which I think he will, he'll be able to draw on the experience of Flushing Meadows to help him over the finish line once more.

John Inverdale, BBC Sport presenter

I can't see Novak Djokovic losing. He would have won the French but for it being on clay, and he has the most weapons at his disposal.

John Lloyd, former British number one

Rafael Nadal played maybe his greatest ever clay court match to beat Novak Djokovic at the French Open. It was so close and came down to the odd point at best. Nadal has won Wimbledon twice and is one hell of a good grass court player but he can't defend as well on grass as he can on clay and his shots are not as potent. Grass will suit Djokovic more and I think he will come through.

Nick Bollettieri, coach

Novak Djokovic is probably furious inside after the French, he's a little ticked off, and his name is hardly mentioned even though he's number one. Then you go to Roger Federer - I think it's very important he does extremely well. If he were to bow out quickly, maybe he would start thinking a little bit. But he's always dangerous. I believe this is going to be one of the most interesting Wimbledons in many years, because every time Nadal steps on a court - be careful.

There's a little bit more pressure on Andy Murray but he moves extremely well, and on grass that's important; he's improved his serve; we all know he returns well; he's not hesitant in coming to the net, which is very important, and he uses the slice as a change of pace.

Richard Krajicek, former Wimbledon champion

I believe it is a toss-up between the big four, although I do not know how fit Nadal is. Murray has shown he is ready and confident for the grass. Federer is always a major title contender. Djokovic is the number one player in the world, and will use the disappointment of the big chance to win the French Open as an extra motivation for his run at Wimbledon.

Looking at the draw, though, I expect a Djokovic-Murray final. That will be a close one, but I believe Murray in five sets. Unless there is a lot of rain for the semi and final and the roof will be closed, then Federer will defend successfully.

Annabel Croft, former British number one

Andy Murray is coming into Wimbledon the strongest he has been in any previous year. He has way more confidence than he had 12 months ago. He is a Grand Slam champion, and a Olympic champion and I just feel everything is coming together perfectly for him. Beating both Federer and Djokovic on his way to gold helped him so much and showed he could do it, and then the US Open title followed.

Andrew Castle, former British number one

I spoke to Jo-Wilfried Tsonga and Tommy Haas this week and they both tipped Roger Federer to win, which is interesting as remarkably few people have. I'm going for Andy Murray. For me, he is at the height of his powers and the three-and-a-half week rest he had following the injury that ruled him out of the French Open will have helped him tremendously. Getting the monkey off his back by winning the US Open, plus beating Federer and Djokovic at the Olympics, was crucial. He played with joy and gusto at Queen's and I think this is his year.

Sam Smith, former British number one

Rafael Nadal - I always say Andy Murray and it jinxes him so this time I'm going to say Rafael Nadal.

Nick Mullins, BBC Sport commentator

Are the stars aligning? In the 12 months since becoming Britain's first finalist in the men's singles for 74 years, Andy Murray's been back on Centre Court to beat Federer to an Olympic gold medal and then claimed his first Grand Slam by beating Djokovic in New York. Another Queen's title ended any lingering doubts about his back injury and, while Nadal's a potential opponent in the last eight, it's all systems go

David Mercer, BBC Sport commentator

Although my heart says Andy Murray my head says Novak Djokovic, who deserves to be the world number one. After coming so close to beating Nadal in Paris, Djokovic will be determined to confirm his status by winning Wimbledon.

Russell Fuller, BBC Radio 5 live commentator

Novak Djokovic came even closer to beating Nadal at Roland Garros than I thought he would, and on this surface - with a generous hand from the draw - he would start as my favourite. But if he does make it to the final, he will be facing a seriously in-form player.

Andrew Cotter, BBC Sport commentator

Novak Djokovic to win the men's singles, avoiding all members of the big three until the final and Ferrer shouldn't provide him with too many problems on grass.

Amazed that Croft has picked Andy  shocking
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