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angiebabez
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Andy Murray Wimbledon Champion 2013

Re: News Articles « Reply #6660 on: June 29, 2013, 09:45 AM »
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Telegraph article

Andy Murray has become the swaggering British brute and ruler of Wimbledon 2013's Centre Court

By Paul Hayward, at Wimbledon11:00PM BST 28 Jun 2013

British No 1 Andy Murray is beginning to rule the home of tennis not seen since the days of Fred Perry 77 years ago.

Putting on a show is not really Andy Murray’s style. He leaves the flamboyance to others. But even he is finding it hard to resist the temptation to make Centre Court his own, to give the crowd what they desire: a dominant British hero to wipe away old fears.

Heaven knows this crowd have suffered enough down the years. They are sick of having to put the kettle on for beaten British challengers; tired of the false hopes and let-downs. The strain of being terribly nice about everything tells in the end. They want someone to burst from that locker room and claim this patch of grass as a place that belongs to British sport. No more deferring to overseas guests, no more prime-time TV torture.
A swaggering brute is what they want to see out there. One that still talks nicely to Sue Barker on the BBC and holds doors open for the elderly, but a swaggering brute nonetheless.

Sport in sacred places demands a proprietorial element. Lord’s must be owned by the mighty English opener and the demon bowler. Twickenham can only be the home of the English rugby monster. Wimbledon has never had this, in men’s tennis: or not since Fred Perry in 1936. The story of the men’s game here is one of gracious hosting and institutionalised failure.

Murray is the game’s best hope in 77 years of breaking that cycle, and he would not be an Olympic and US Open champion if he failed to recognise this chance to add a Wimbledon title to his record.

The falls of Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer on his side of the draw were a gift he could hardly fail to be inspired by. Nobody expects him to say that publicly, because he, too, could run into a bandit before next week. But the unusual dynamics of this year’s tournament are an invitation to him to weep in victory rather than defeat when the pots are handed out.

The time has arrived for him to win not by negotiation but the strong-arm tactic of imposing his fitness and talent. This was plainly his aim against the 31-year-old Tommy Robredo, named after The Who’s rock opera, and the kind of solidly credentialed opponent who will make a fancied player look good if he is on his game.

Murray broke the one-time world No 5 three times in the opening set and lost only one of his 15 service games. He is starting to look less like a regular visitor to Centre Court than the man who holds its keys.

Murray is on the road to being the kind of player opponents have to forcibly remove. Centre Court is no longer a place to manage expectations, muddle through the rounds and hope to still be in the tournament on the final Sunday.

Even his cries of “yes” and “come on” have dropped a couple of notes.

Before, they made him sound like a faintly vulnerable lad. Now they are barked. The journey we are witnessing is the familiar one from boy to man.

Removed from his half of the draw by the time he confronted Robredo were Federer, Nadal and Jo-Wilfried Tsonga. A striking win for Poland’s Jerzy Janowicz also cleared out the No 15 seed Nicolas Almagro. Janowicz, 22, could be dangerous down the line. He rose 195 places in the rankings last year but surely Murray cannot fear him.

This was a straight-sets victory of real authority: his third of the week, following a 6-4, 6-3, 6-2 defeat of Benjamin Becker on Monday and a 6-3, 6-3, 7-5 win over Yen Hsun Lu. So Murray glides into the second week with 14 straight wins on grass and nine winning sets in a row on Centre Court, where a livelier than usual crowd quickly recognised the new assured mood in their idol.

Centre Court will never be a cauldron. It will take a while to raise the buzz from garden centre level. But Murray and his followers do now have a chance to up the stakes together, closer to London Olympic heights, especially as his transformation from nearly man to champion was effected on this court, back in August, with Olympic victory over Federer.

The change in him is startling. And the crowd see it. He is composed, consistent through his matches and less troubled by his own mistakes. A tennis match is no longer a stormy sea. Implanted in his brain no doubt is the sense that average players cannot live with him. Even in press conferences he is different. His voice is stronger, his head and shoulders straighter.

The only problem he is giving himself is an obligation to reach the final.

To fall short now would be crushing. “There’s a lot more pressure on me now with them [Nadal and Federer] being out,” he said. He says he ignores newspapers but sees headlines strewn across the tables in relaxation areas.

They are all pointing him to a final against Novak Djokovic, but not in the old edgy way. Guess what: next week’s crowd can enjoy this now. Their man is a growing force, in full command of his abilities, with his best chance yet of joining Nadal, Federer and Djokovic on the scroll of Wimbledon champions. Centre Court is not fully his yet, but he looks like he belongs.
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Milly87
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Re: News Articles « Reply #6661 on: June 29, 2013, 11:39 AM »
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Mathew Syed's interview with Judy from today's Times. I absolutely love the insight into Andy's time at home during Wimbledon. Judy seems a genuinely nice person and both her sons are good people so she's obviously done a good job along with Will. I think she's right when she says much of the hate against is driven by sexism.



"It was the hate mail that used to get Judy Murray down. The letters, sometimes neatly handwritten, often typed, that would arrive in large sheaves at Wimbledon and her home in Dunblane. Letters telling her that she was “a bad mother”, “a terrible influence”, “an awful person” who was damaging her children. The vicious ones were invariably anonymous.

“I used to dread them,” she says when we meet near Centre Court. “A lot of my self-image, like most mothers, is bound up in being a good parent. It was incredibly hurtful to get letters from people I didn’t know — and who didn’t know me — telling me that I was harming my kids. It shook my confidence.
“For a while, I tried to change. People seemed to be offended by my fist pumping when I watched Andy from the stands. So I became more demure, but it didn’t feel natural. A friend said to me, ‘Why are you being so quiet?’ So I went back to the way I was. It feels much better. I just hope people can accept me for who I am.”

It strikes me as curious that this hard-working, principled and rather inspirational woman has had to fight so hard for public affection. She has only ever tried to do the best by her boys, Andy, 26, and Jamie, 27, often with scant support from the British tennis establishment. She coached them almost every evening on public courts in Dunblane while they were growing up and, along with Will, her ex-husband, spent her life savings to send Andy to Spain when he was 15 to turbo-charge his development. “I think a lot of the problems were to do with my gender,” she says. “People seemed to have a problem with a mother pushing her sons. If I was a man, nobody would have blinked an eyelid.”

Her relationship with the British public has undergone something of a transformation over recent months. She receives less hate mail, for a start. People smile more often when she arrives in SW19. It is almost as if she has been given permission to be herself: a woman who took an active role in her sons’ sporting development and who likes to bare her teeth from time to time when they win. OK, she is not Jane Henman, the ultra-demure mother of the former British No 1, but is that such a bad thing?

In recent years, Judy has played a more withdrawn role in Andy’s life. Her younger son has lived in the south of England for six years and has a support team around him, while Judy lives in Dunblane. “The apron strings stuff was always overdone,” she says. “I was very involved in his tennis when he was young, but the idea that I spend my time ordering him around today is ridiculous. He is his own man.”

That is one reason why Wimbledon, along with the other grand slam events, is so precious to Judy. Andy has always enjoyed having his mother around at “the big ones”.
“He likes to have emotional support when the pressure is intense,” she says. “He has a big team, but they are all employed by him. It is sometimes easier to talk about your feelings and fears to your girlfriend or family than your coaching team, who are all much older, and all male.”
For Wimbledon fortnight, Judy has moved in with Andy and his girlfriend, Kim Sears, at their home in Oxshott, Surrey. “It is a great dynamic. On Wednesday night [after Andy’s win over Lu Yen-hsun in the second round] we watched an episode of The Apprentice and then Kim and I sat on the edge of the Jacuzzi after Andy had his ice bath. We chatted about anything and everything. The only subject we avoided was tennis.

“In the mornings, we tend to have breakfast together [Andy has bagels with fried eggs, yoghurt and a smoothie] and I then take the dogs for a walk, while Andy gets his head together for the drive up to Wimbledon [he is driven on the 30-minute journey by his friend Rob]. I think it is great for him to be at his own home. It just provides that bit of normality.”

I am struck by her warmth as well as her vulnerability. She plays with her hands as she talks, and occasionally blushes when discussing the ironies of celebrity. Earlier this week, she was lauded on TV for “growing old gracefully” by a pundit who thought that her lighter colouring was naturally grey. “Me and Kim almost fell over laughing,” she says. “My hair is getting greyer but, believe it or not, I actually paid for this colour. It is supposed to be ‘white hot blonde’.”

Her relationship with Will ended in 1996 and they divorced in 2005. It was a difficult period for the two boys, who are always careful to credit both parents equally for their development. Since then, she has had one long-term relationship, which ended last September. She is now single, but comfortable with it. She feels, she says, more feminine that at any time in her life.
“My self-image for years was as a tennis coach,” she says. “I wore jeans and a hoodie or a tracksuit. My worst nightmare was going to a wedding. I didn’t feel comfortable dressing up and hardly ever wore heels. I think I was worried that people wouldn’t take me seriously as a coach. Things have changed a lot in recent years. I actually enjoy dressing up now. Perhaps my sense of self is changing a bit.”
I ask if she has picked out anything nice to wear for later in the championships. “Funny you should say that,” she says, laughing. “I have been invited into the Royal Box on Monday, so if the weather is good I will wear a nice Alexander McQueen dress, mossy green and black. Now that is not something you would have heard me saying a few years ago!”

As we talk, the perception of a demented Tiger Mother is a million miles away. She is kind and tactile, and her love for her boys is almost palpable. When I ask about her happiest moment in tennis, she nearly wells up. “That would have to be watching Jamie and Andy playing doubles at the Olympics and Davis Cup,” she says. “You are busting when you see that, the two boys on the same court, together.”

Her workrate has never relented. Today, she is the coach of the British women’s tennis team and spearheads a project to get children active. Set4Sport involves fun games that can be played at home using household objects. “I am passionate about getting youngsters into sport,” she says. “My goal at the moment is to build a tennis academy in Dunblane. I can see myself there in ten years, working with the kids. I would love that.”

Dunblane made headlines in 1996 when Thomas Hamilton, an unemployed former shopkeeper, shot dead 16 children and a teacher in the school gym. Andy, then 8, and his schoolmates were walking towards the gym at the time but were ushered to the headmaster’s study, where they waited for two hours. Andy, who has always struggled to talk about the incident, broke down when asked about it during a recent documentary.

“The hall where the shooting took place has been demolished and replaced with a memorial garden,” Judy says. “I often go to the new hall to take sports sessions. In some ways, you have to move on, and I think we have as a community.”
I watch as she is wished well by players, coaches and spectators. The frostiness, so evident on internet forums as recently as a few months ago, is on the wane. We have learned to embrace this steely, singular and rather remarkable mother. Perhaps, as a nation, we have grown up a little.
[ Last edit by Milly87 June 29, 2013, 11:42 AM ] IP Logged
xxdanixx
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Re: News Articles « Reply #6662 on: June 29, 2013, 11:56 AM »
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Thank you very much Milly!As someone who can't read beyond the paywall,it's wonderful to get to read the interview with Judy. hug
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sidtypical
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grrr...

Re: News Articles « Reply #6663 on: June 29, 2013, 12:00 PM »
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2 great articles. Thanks for posting Angie and Milly :-)
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xxdanixx
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Re: News Articles « Reply #6664 on: June 29, 2013, 12:06 PM »
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2 great articles. Thanks for posting Angie and Milly :-)
I owe you thanks now Sid-I'd missed the article Angie posted til you!So thank you Smile

And thanks for posting it Ange-I've read my "10 free articles" for this month,so I can't access any Telegraph articles at the moment Rolling Eyes

Why do papers have to make stuff so complicated?Why can't we just read them,grrr....

Still,2 great pieces,so thanks,both of you!I love reading interviews with Judy,she seems like such a nice person and I really like her.Great to hear she's feeling more comfortable in herself nowadays Smile
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xxdanixx
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Re: News Articles « Reply #6665 on: June 29, 2013, 12:47 PM »
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Andy Murray not used to weekend rest at Wimbledon

Andy Murray has said that he is not used to having the middle weekend off at Wimbledon.

The British number one and second seed at this year's Championships will have two days' rest on Saturday and Sunday after completing his third-round match under the Centre Court roof yesterday.

"I'll probably practice a bit longer (today)," said the 26-year-old. "Normally on the days off you practice for maybe an hour. But I'll practice for about an hour and a half and have a slightly tougher practice session. Then Sunday we'll be back to the same sort of schedule.

"I haven't played that many times on the Friday at Wimbledon, so it's a little bit new for me.

"I have no idea whether it makes any difference. Roger (Federer) always played on Monday. He had a pretty good record here. But I don't know if it's got anything to do with the two days off over the weekend."

Murray will play either Victor Troicki or Mikhail Youzhny in the fourth round at SW19.

http://www.sportsmole.co.uk/tennis/wimbledon/news/murray-not-used-to-wimbledon-rest_91166.html
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sidtypical
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grrr...

Re: News Articles « Reply #6666 on: June 29, 2013, 01:54 PM »
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Andy Murray not used to weekend rest at Wimbledon

Andy Murray has said that he is not used to having the middle weekend off at Wimbledon.

The British number one and second seed at this year's Championships will have two days' rest on Saturday and Sunday after completing his third-round match under the Centre Court roof yesterday.

"I'll probably practice a bit longer (today)," said the 26-year-old. "Normally on the days off you practice for maybe an hour. But I'll practice for about an hour and a half and have a slightly tougher practice session. Then Sunday we'll be back to the same sort of schedule.

"I haven't played that many times on the Friday at Wimbledon, so it's a little bit new for me.

"I have no idea whether it makes any difference. Roger (Federer) always played on Monday. He had a pretty good record here. But I don't know if it's got anything to do with the two days off over the weekend."

Murray will play either Victor Troicki or Mikhail Youzhny in the fourth round at SW19.

http://www.sportsmole.co.uk/tennis/wimbledon/news/murray-not-used-to-wimbledon-rest_91166.html


It's Youzhny !

thanks dani :-)
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Ruthie
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Re: News Articles « Reply #6667 on: June 29, 2013, 09:33 PM »
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loved the telegraph article - it expresses the feeling I have that Andy has grown in stature and self-belief and the public perceptions of him have changed in a fundamental way. 
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robbie
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Re: News Articles « Reply #6668 on: June 29, 2013, 10:10 PM »
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Howard Bryant...Espn tennis....."Djokovic is the gold standard" but he doesn't rate Murray....Grrrrrr grr
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blueberryhill
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Re: News Articles « Reply #6669 on: June 30, 2013, 09:19 AM »
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Lovely article about Judy wub. Thanx clap
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angiebabez
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Andy Murray Wimbledon Champion 2013

Re: News Articles « Reply #6670 on: June 30, 2013, 09:51 AM »
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Andy's latest BBC column

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/tennis/23115753
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Caz
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I'd like to be the good person my dog thinks I am!

Re: News Articles « Reply #6671 on: June 30, 2013, 12:53 PM »
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Angie......loved the thought of 'the swaggering brute who talks nicely to Sue Barker and holds doors open for the elderly'.......That's our Andy al lright.......He's just a 'lamb in wolf's clothing'!  wub
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Caz
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I'd like to be the good person my dog thinks I am!

Re: News Articles « Reply #6672 on: June 30, 2013, 12:56 PM »
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A big thank you to all you guys who take the time to post these interesting articles! It's much appreciated!  yes
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xxdanixx
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Re: News Articles « Reply #6673 on: June 30, 2013, 11:40 PM »
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Andy Murray is only thinking of Wimbledon glory says coach Ivan Lendl

The Scot's coach insists that a final appearance is no longer enough, and that Muzza must win the tournament

Ivan Lendl is a man on a mission – to win Wimbledon with Andy Murray.

The US Open champion continues his quest for home Grand Slam glory against Mikhail Youzhny, on a day when fellow British star Laura Robson can book a quarter-final clash with Serena  Williams. A final showdown with red-hot world No.1 Novak Djokovic is now only three matches away for Murray.

But the Scot’s coach Lendl, who lost the Wimbledon final in both 1986 and 1987, insisted returning to the final is not good enough.

“The chips fall where they fall but the goal is not to make the semis, not the finals – the goal is to win it,” said the winner of eight Grand Slams. “The goal is still the same as last year, to try to win it, do the best you can.

“I have not thought about there being a more relaxed ­atmosphere now he has won the Olympics and the US Open.

“I am more concerned what shots he is hitting right, what he is not hitting right, keep the things he is doing well going. That is my mission. One point at a time, that’s the idea.”

Murray said Lendl helped him on and off the court. “We discuss all sorts,” said the world No.2.

“We discuss the tactics of the matches, we talk about ways of trying to stay ­concentrated on my own matches.

“I believe I can win Wimbledon. I have a chance this year – but I need to play my best tennis.”



http://www.mirror.co.uk/sport/tennis/andy-murray-only-thinking-wimbledon-2014182

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xxdanixx
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Re: News Articles « Reply #6674 on: July 01, 2013, 10:39 AM »
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Nice article by Tsonga-his good wishes at the end for Andy seem really genuine,which I really like.Also nice to hear that the other players admire how well Andy copes with the pressure from Britain! Smile

Tsonga: Local hero Murray will have an added pressure at his home Grand Slam

Sadly I am at home in Switzerland now rather than preparing for Wimbledon’s second week but even from this far away I might have a better idea than most of what it feels like to be Andy Murray right now.

I have it in common with Andy that we both come from countries that host Grand Slams, and while there are some big advantages to that it also brings with it a special kind of pressure.

It was only a few weeks ago that I made it to the semi-finals at Roland Garros so it is quite fresh in my mind: everyone wants to talk to you, everyone is desperate for you to do well, you yourself are desperate to succeed.

These are pressures that Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic, for example, have never experienced and while it is definitely great to have the support from the home fans it can bring its challenges too.

I think Andy handles it well and other players in the locker room admire the way he copes, especially as he is the only player from his country at the really top level.

The rest of us also know that you cannot just turn up and expect to win your matches against the players ranked lower than you. The standard of the top 30 is very good right now, so while Murray and Djokovic are favourites to meet in the final — and I think that is what will happen — they cannot relax for a second.

Maybe the thing that separates the top four from other players is that they are able to hold their highest level of play longer than others, and they will both need to do that.

Experience is a massive thing in these situations and that is why I think the biggest single threat to a Djokovic-Murray final might come from Novak’s possible quarter final opponent Tomas Berdych.

Apart from having an incredibly powerful game he knows what it is like to beat the biggest players on the biggest stages, so he is very capable of causing an upset if he makes it to the last eight, and Novak beats Tommy Haas, who has been playing really well. Juan Martin Del Potro is another with that experience, so he would be no easy semi-final opponent either.

Not that Andy has it easy, I have played those who he is most likely to face en route to the final and on their day they are difficult opposition.

Mikhail Youzhny likes the grass and has plenty of weapons to hurt you with. At 31 he knows his chances will not last forever so he will see this as a big opportunity.

I think maybe Andy’s hardest matches would be today and in the semi-finals, but if he was to meet Fernando Verdasco in the quarters he would have to beware his huge lefthanded forehand.

My feeling is that Andy is ready for these challenges. I will wish him the best — and I will have plenty of understanding for him.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/tennis/article-2352029/Wimbledon-2013-Jo-Wilfried-Tsonga--Andy-Murray-added-pressure.html
[ Last edit by xxdanixx July 01, 2013, 10:56 AM ] IP Logged
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