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heavenlyangel
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Newspaper Articles « Reply #15 on: September 13, 2005, 09:52 PM »
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Just got this on google news alert :

http://www.sportinglife.com/tennis/news/story_get.cgi?STORY_NAME=tennis/05/08/23/TENNIS_Column.html
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heavenlyangel
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the sun online : davis cup « Reply #16 on: September 15, 2005, 07:35 AM »
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http://www.thesun.co.uk/article/0,,3-2005420622,00.html
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hulahoop
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Newspaper Articles « Reply #17 on: September 18, 2005, 09:20 AM »
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The Mail On Sunday

from challenge of meeting world No 1



EXCLUSIVE
From
Malcolm Folley
IN EVIAN




   ANDY MURRAY is breaking sweat on the shore of Lake Geneva in readiness for this week’s meeting with Roger Federer, the man destined to become the greatest tennis player of all time.
   Murray, 18, may not have illuminated the summer skyline as spectacularly as Freddie Flintoff or Kevin Pietersen, but his breakthrough on to the world stage is real enough.
   His life since he made a formidable entrance at Wimbledon has been lived at fast-forward. John McEnroe, who practised with the Scot during the recent US Open, forecasts that Murray, ranked 111 in the world, will be inside the top 20 by the end of next year.
   The learning curve is poised to move steeply upwards in Geneva, when Federer is assured of a homecoming hero’s reception on Friday as he leads Switzerland against Britain in the Davis Cup, when the winners stay in the World Group and the losers will be banished to Zonal Group One.
   ‘It’s not every day you have the chance to play against the World No 1, so it’s something I’m very excited about,’ said Murray, who belongs to the generation of British sportsmen unafflicted by inhibition, unmoved by reputation. ‘I think we’re going to win 3-2.’
   Britain’s captain, Jeremy Bates, is wisely keeping counsel on who he will select to play in the opening singles, but with Federer also widely expected to make a rare appearance in the doubles rubber, Murray is liable to come into conflict with him. Bates’s faith in the teenager is absolute. ‘You either grow in the environment of Wimbledon or the Davis Cup or you shrink,’ he said. ‘Andy is a foot taller than he was six months ago.’ That view is endorsed by Greg Rusedski, revelling in his role as the elder statesman of British tennis. ‘When Tim (Henman) and I go away from the game, Andy will be up at the top for a long time,’ said Rusedski. ‘Andy’s got a great attitude, he gives 100 per cent from the first ball to the last. He’s already fitter than he was, but you have to remember that he’s growing into his body.’
   Murray, who became the youngest Davis Cup player in British history when he partnered David Sherwood to a magnificent win over highly-ranked Israelis Jonathan Erlich and Andy Ram in March, will definitely feature in one of the singles rubbers, where the British team have targeted Swiss No 2 Stanislas Wawrinka as vulnerable. ‘That win in Israel is one of the best memories of my life,’ said Murray. ‘It is an incredible feeling to play for your country.’
   He is in relaxed mood, his alliance with Rusedski strong, his place within a young team featuring Alan Mackin, Sherwood and sparring partner Jamie Baker of growing significance.
   ‘Greg has a lot of experience and is one of the most knowledgeable players in the game,’ added Murray. ‘He goes into a lot of detail and willingly gives me advice when I need it.’
   Other voices have been less encouraging, nagging him to the point of visible irritation. Murray’s level of fitness has been questioned, with critics scornful of the manner in which he cramped in the fifth set against David Nalbandian at Wimbledon and again during the climax of his marathon second-round match at the US Open with Arnaud Clement.
   The youngster is tired and confused at having continually to defend himself. ‘A few people have to realise I’ve just turned 18,’ he said. ‘It is unusual for someone to fully develop before they are 21 — unless you are completely different like Rafael Nadal (who won the French Open at 19 this summer). I have just played for 10 weeks in a row in North America, won two tournaments playing at least two matches a week, and travelled thousands of miles. I can’t be too unfit.
   ‘I do get disappointed when some people cannot accept when someone is doing well. Yes, I struggled in a couple of five-set matches, but I also won one against a guy who has been as high as No 15 in the world. But when you look at the matches where I cramped, there is no sign of me being distressed the point before I went down. And it wasn’t as if I finished the match feeling like death.
   ‘I don’t think people can question my work-rate. I work very hard. My tennis is improving but, of course, I know I have to get physically stronger. That’s
normal for anyone my age.’ Over the winter, Murray is arranging to work with Frank Dick, who previously trained Boris Becker, as well as worldclass athletes like Linford Christie and Denise Lewis. Murray will also visit a French clinic to have blood, urine and sweat samples analysed. ‘I want to establish if there is a reason why I’m prone to getting cramp,’ he explained.
   McEnroe’s friendship with Murray is tangible evidence of the teenager’s rise. A man who still rages for perfection is not tolerant of fools or those who take short cuts.
   ‘I asked if he would hit with me in New York because I respect his opinion so much as he has been around the game for so long,’ said Murray, no stranger to the odd emotional outburst on court. ‘I’m nowhere near as bad as John! He was getting pretty angry when I was practising with him, in fact. He was complaining he’d been in the commentators’ box all day and his back was still sore. Maybe, I just rattled him a bit ...’ Murray smiled at the memory. ‘I prefer to listen to John’s thoughts rather than a lot of others. He’s a legend of the game.’
   Rusedski’s decision to remain loyal to the Davis Cup after Henman opted to retire from international duty at the beginning of this year is proving pivotal to Murray’s development.
   Bates said: ‘I can’t say enough about what it means to have Greg in the team, a top player endorsing our message is like a dream come true.’
   In practice on Friday, Rusedski exhibited the enthusiasm of a teenager, not a man just passed his 32nd birthday and looking forward to fatherhood in four months.
   ‘I love Davis Cup and I want to be involved with the younger players coming along,’ said Rusedski, who has painstakingly reconstructed his career after the trauma of being falsely accused of taking a banned substance two years ago.
   ‘I’ve had 18 months without injury — or controversy — and I feel like I did in my early 20s. The Swiss obviously put down a clay court to meet Wawrinka’s strengths — Federer can play on any surface — but I have beaten him on the two occasions we’ve met.’
   British strategy is dependent on Rusedski beating Wawrinka on the first day. Rusedski has had a superb summer, winning in Newport, Rhode Island, and making semi-finals in two Masters tournaments, enabling him to climb back to No 29, one place behind Henman.
   ‘I don’t know if Tim finds it amusing that I’m on his tail again, but I like my chances of finishing as British No 1 for the first time in eight years,’ he said.
   Rusedski concluded practice on Friday, playfully hitting with a sevenyear-old local girl as Murray collected his rackets, counting down the days until the mission against Federer and Co begins in earnest.



(I cant link it as it's subscription only) Smile
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heavenlyangel
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Newspaper Articles « Reply #18 on: September 19, 2005, 08:03 AM »
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http://www.tennisnews.com/exclusive.php?pID=7644

Gives an explanation as to why Andy did not get a wild card into the US Open
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hulahoop
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Newspaper Articles « Reply #19 on: September 19, 2005, 04:01 PM »
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Evil or Very Mad  Humph! It's about time Wimbledon and the LTA got their heads out of their backsides. Have we got a plethora of prodigies to worry about WC's into Wimbledon?  Rolling Eyes



Andy could have done with the Qually week off. He might have had the stamina for the Clement match then.
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Josh
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Newspaper Articles « Reply #20 on: September 19, 2005, 07:47 PM »
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i think we should stop giving wildcards to people who have had them and failed.  How many times have we wasted one on a Bogdanovic or a Delgado only to see them lose in straight sets.  At least Sherwood and ANdy actually won their first round matches this year.  We should donate them on a basis of well you have played in previous Wimbledons.
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hulahoop
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Newspaper Articles « Reply #21 on: September 20, 2005, 08:08 PM »
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Quote from: "Josh"
i think we should stop giving wildcards to people who have had them and failed.  How many times have we wasted one on a Bogdanovic or a Delgado only to see them lose in straight sets.  At least Sherwood and ANdy actually won their first round matches this year.  We should donate them on a basis of well you have played in previous Wimbledons.


Completely agree. If it takes Wimbledon stopping giving people like Arvind Parmar and Lee Childs Wild Cards, and entering a reciprocal arrangement with the other Grand Slams, then great. It makes complete sense to me.

 Rolling Eyes  But hey, what do I know? In all the years I've been a tennis addict, Wimbledon's heirachy have always been idiots.
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eira_arian
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Fed ex « Reply #22 on: September 20, 2005, 09:08 PM »
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http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/4265466.stm
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hulahoop
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Newspaper Articles « Reply #23 on: September 20, 2005, 10:50 PM »
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I love Rog.


What complete sense he makes.


With the plethora of injuries on the circuit, playing Davis Cup every 2 years would make things so much easier.

Also, while we are on the subject, can they stop the stupidity that means the holders get a grand total of 3 months before they are challenged? No other Sport wouldn't give the holders a decent chance of enjoying their success. Win it at the end of a season and you caould be losers by February.

 Rolling Eyes  Shock  Completely mad.
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eira_arian
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equal prize money « Reply #24 on: September 21, 2005, 11:59 AM »
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http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tennis/4265328.stm

what does everyone think about this? in an age of so called equality it seems only fair as all competitors train equally hard and put as much into their matches... but then again the men do play 5 setters...
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heavenlyangel
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Newspaper Articles « Reply #25 on: September 21, 2005, 12:23 PM »
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Well for years i have said if women want same pay as men on the tennis circuit then they should therefore play same amount of games.

I dont want to get into an argument over this just saying my opinion thats all and respect other peoples views on this subject.
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Josh
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Newspaper Articles « Reply #26 on: September 21, 2005, 01:56 PM »
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I completly agree. Once women play four hour+ marathons like Andy did twice at USOpen, then they can get paid as much.  This is the one timw I think Wimbledon have actually got it right as all the other Slams pay equally
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KitKat
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Newspaper Articles « Reply #27 on: September 21, 2005, 02:03 PM »
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I think Andy having to qualify for the US Open would have made it all the sweeter for him, proving that he can enter the big comps on his own merit, it would of course have been better if he hadn't had all the other tournaments just before hand.
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hulahoop
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Newspaper Articles « Reply #28 on: September 21, 2005, 06:42 PM »
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Quote from: "Josh"
I completly agree. Once women play four hour+ marathons like Andy did twice at USOpen, then they can get paid as much.  This is the one timw I think Wimbledon have actually got it right as all the other Slams pay equally


Agreement here too. After the fiasco of most women's finals, if they want equal pay, then play equal matches. i wonder how they'd cope with the stamina and ebbs and flows of a five setter?
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eira_arian
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mother superior « Reply #29 on: September 22, 2005, 09:19 PM »
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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/main.jhtml;jsessionid=T2ZROFBAXTT0HQFIQMFSM54AVCBQ0JVC?xml=/sport/2005/09/22/stjudy22.xml&sSheet=/sport/2005/09/22/ixtenn.html

thus speaks judy murray - bit of a legend really Very Happy
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