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Your Fitness and Well Being

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Paul Whitehead
Your Fitness and Well Being « on: September 04, 2005, 12:10 PM »
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Hi Andrew,

I have been reading with interest in the newspapers about your fitness/cramp problems and i would like to suggest that you visit an inspired practitioner called Clare Kelway. If you have any difficulties, i truly believe she will be able to help in whatever way is necessary.

Clare Kelway runs a Clinic in Oxshott, Surrey
Number 01372 844922
[email protected]

I am simply a happy patient of her work
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Your Fitness and Well Being « Reply #1 on: September 04, 2005, 09:44 PM »
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Very Happy  Nice thought, but I think the rapidly growing team of experts he's calling upon have this in hand.

         
 
 
Quote
Britain’s new wonder boy suffers at the US Open


Murray to be sent for tests after breaking down yet again



From Peter Higgs AT FLUSHING MEADOWS



ANDY MURRAY will undergo extensive tests on his physical conditioning at two high-level assessment centres in France after his second Grand Slam campaign was ended by cramp.
   Scot Murray, 18, demonstrated the talent that has made such as John McEnroe predict that he is destined for a place in the world’s top 10 as he fought back dramatically from two sets down to take Frenchman Arnaud Clement, 27, into a fifth set in the US Open second round.
   But, as he did against David Nalbandian at Wimbledon, Murray ran out of steam, failing to take a game in the final set as Clement — rated the fittest player in France — won a four-hour marathon 6-2, 7-6, 2-6, 6-7, 6-0.
   While the Briton blamed his punishing schedule of the past 10 weeks — and renewed his attack on the All England Club for failing to secure him a wild-card into the US Open — his back-up team are already planning tests that will discover whether there is a deep-rooted problem.
   Fitness trainer Jean Pierre Bruyere is arranging for Murray to visit the French national physical education institute in Paris and then Dijon University — which is used by Formula One drivers — for examinations that will spread over several days.
   The tests are only precautionary and may confirm simply that he is a growing youngster whose rapid rise through the senior ranks is catching him out physically.
   But as Clement confirmed after being impressed by the youngster’s all-court game Murray’s one obvious weakness is his fitness. ‘It’s quite natural he should have problems because he just hasn’t played enough matches at this level,’ said the former world top 20 player, now ranked 91. ‘He’ll improve in that respect the more he plays.
   ‘He has a good first serve, he varies his rhythm well and he will learn to manage his matches better. There’s no doubt he will go into the top 50 and we’ll see from there.’
   Ironically, Clement had lost his previous six five-set matches. ‘I was aware of that record and I wanted to put it right. But this time there wasn’t really a fifth set, was there?’
   Murray, who served 26 aces, refused to be downcast. After playing a poor first set he fought back well, only to lose the crucial second-set tie-break (7-2) and then battle his way through the next two sets with increasing confidence to thrill a packed crowd around the Flushing Meadows’ Grandstand Court.
   But in his first service game of the fifth set he pulled up with cramp and had to call on the trainer for a threeminute injury time-out. When he returned he dropped his serve — and had nothing left to come back again.
   Yet, after climbing from 380 in the world to just outside the top 100, he had plenty of reasons to be cheerful about the last three months. A demanding 10-week schedule, in which he won two Challenger tournaments, three US Open qualifying matches, and a three-hour 19-minute first-round five-setter against Andrei Pavel had caught up with him.
   Murray said: ‘I didn’t really get any more cramp after I saw the trainer. But I just couldn’t move. Mentally, I lost it after my serve was broken. I just got really, really tired and completely drained. It’s more mental than anything. It’s difficult after 10 weeks to play two five-set matches in a row. Really, really tough.’
   Murray was positive about his first US Open appearance. ‘I think it’s been a pretty good effort,’ said the 2004 US junior champion, ‘as I was expecting a wild-card and then being told a few days before the qualifying that the US Open didn’t want to give it to you because Wimbledon didn’t want to trade. Mentally that was pretty tough. I think I did well coming through and then winning my first five-set match.
   ‘Clement is playing very well. He came through qualifying and beat [former French Open champion] Juan Carlos Ferrero in three sets. I don’t think I did a bad job today and I’m happy with what I’ve achieved here.’
   Murray has decided to pull out of a Challenger event in Turkey this week and will take a break, possibly at home in Dunblane, before preparing for the Davis Cup world group qualifier against Switzerland — and world No 1 Roger Federer — in Geneva, starting on September 23.
   He is open-minded about whether extra weight-training is required. He said: ‘It’s not that easy when you’re injured for six months at the start of last year with a knee problem, then you get told it’s best not to do weights. I did six months of upper body weights.
   ‘Then I grew a lot at the start of this year and couldn’t do any. I’ll have to sit down with my physio and my coach and decide if I need to go to the gym.’



He's starting to earn some money now, so I think he can afford to put himself in good hands. Not that I'm knocking your suggestion. I see a chiropractor on a regular basis and she's brilliant at keeping me mobile. Nothing on the NHS compares.  Evil or Very Mad


Embarassed Sorry, just seen Mark has posted re this in the News Section.
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Your Fitness and Well Being « Reply #2 on: September 29, 2005, 08:14 PM »
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Quote from: "Tally"
Very Happy  Nice thought, but I think the rapidly growing team of experts he's calling upon have this in hand.

         
 
 
Quote
Britain’s new wonder boy suffers at the US Open


Murray to be sent for tests after breaking down yet again



From Peter Higgs AT FLUSHING MEADOWS



ANDY MURRAY will undergo extensive tests on his physical conditioning at two high-level assessment centres in France after his second Grand Slam campaign was ended by cramp.
   Scot Murray, 18, demonstrated the talent that has made such as John McEnroe predict that he is destined for a place in the world’s top 10 as he fought back dramatically from two sets down to take Frenchman Arnaud Clement, 27, into a fifth set in the US Open second round.
   But, as he did against David Nalbandian at Wimbledon, Murray ran out of steam, failing to take a game in the final set as Clement — rated the fittest player in France — won a four-hour marathon 6-2, 7-6, 2-6, 6-7, 6-0.
   While the Briton blamed his punishing schedule of the past 10 weeks — and renewed his attack on the All England Club for failing to secure him a wild-card into the US Open — his back-up team are already planning tests that will discover whether there is a deep-rooted problem.
   Fitness trainer Jean Pierre Bruyere is arranging for Murray to visit the French national physical education institute in Paris and then Dijon University — which is used by Formula One drivers — for examinations that will spread over several days.
   The tests are only precautionary and may confirm simply that he is a growing youngster whose rapid rise through the senior ranks is catching him out physically.
   But as Clement confirmed after being impressed by the youngster’s all-court game Murray’s one obvious weakness is his fitness. ‘It’s quite natural he should have problems because he just hasn’t played enough matches at this level,’ said the former world top 20 player, now ranked 91. ‘He’ll improve in that respect the more he plays.
   ‘He has a good first serve, he varies his rhythm well and he will learn to manage his matches better. There’s no doubt he will go into the top 50 and we’ll see from there.’
   Ironically, Clement had lost his previous six five-set matches. ‘I was aware of that record and I wanted to put it right. But this time there wasn’t really a fifth set, was there?’
   Murray, who served 26 aces, refused to be downcast. After playing a poor first set he fought back well, only to lose the crucial second-set tie-break (7-2) and then battle his way through the next two sets with increasing confidence to thrill a packed crowd around the Flushing Meadows’ Grandstand Court.
   But in his first service game of the fifth set he pulled up with cramp and had to call on the trainer for a threeminute injury time-out. When he returned he dropped his serve — and had nothing left to come back again.
   Yet, after climbing from 380 in the world to just outside the top 100, he had plenty of reasons to be cheerful about the last three months. A demanding 10-week schedule, in which he won two Challenger tournaments, three US Open qualifying matches, and a three-hour 19-minute first-round five-setter against Andrei Pavel had caught up with him.
   Murray said: ‘I didn’t really get any more cramp after I saw the trainer. But I just couldn’t move. Mentally, I lost it after my serve was broken. I just got really, really tired and completely drained. It’s more mental than anything. It’s difficult after 10 weeks to play two five-set matches in a row. Really, really tough.’
   Murray was positive about his first US Open appearance. ‘I think it’s been a pretty good effort,’ said the 2004 US junior champion, ‘as I was expecting a wild-card and then being told a few days before the qualifying that the US Open didn’t want to give it to you because Wimbledon didn’t want to trade. Mentally that was pretty tough. I think I did well coming through and then winning my first five-set match.
   ‘Clement is playing very well. He came through qualifying and beat [former French Open champion] Juan Carlos Ferrero in three sets. I don’t think I did a bad job today and I’m happy with what I’ve achieved here.’
   Murray has decided to pull out of a Challenger event in Turkey this week and will take a break, possibly at home in Dunblane, before preparing for the Davis Cup world group qualifier against Switzerland — and world No 1 Roger Federer — in Geneva, starting on September 23.
   He is open-minded about whether extra weight-training is required. He said: ‘It’s not that easy when you’re injured for six months at the start of last year with a knee problem, then you get told it’s best not to do weights. I did six months of upper body weights.
   ‘Then I grew a lot at the start of this year and couldn’t do any. I’ll have to sit down with my physio and my coach and decide if I need to go to the gym.’



He's starting to earn some money now, so I think he can afford to put himself in good hands. Not that I'm knocking your suggestion. I see a chiropractor on a regular basis and she's brilliant at keeping me mobile. Nothing on the NHS compares.  Evil or Very Mad


Embarassed Sorry, just seen Mark has posted re this in the News Section.


Hi Tally.
Andy may be earning more prize money now, but maintaining the standard of tennis he's at now is going to be costly. What with coaches and fitness trainers and equipment needed. Most of the money earnt through tournaments goes toward training and experience. It'll cost Andy well over £10000 a year to stay at the level hes at. It's not pocket money. It gets spent on his tennis.
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