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Benefits and financial support

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teejay1
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Re: Benefits and financial support « Reply #555 on: April 02, 2013, 04:41 PM »
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The bedroom tax situation is a total crock if you ask me. The vast majority of people who will be affected will be disabled people, who need space to store equipment like wheelchairs etc, or need a spare room to enable someone to stay over in the event of illness etc.

As a disabled person living in a bungalow (part of a sheltered accommodation complex) I don't have an issue with paying the bedroom tax as such. What I have an issue with is the fact that someone like me has no choice in the matter. You either pay or you move. Well, with the best will in the world I live in a specially adapted bungalow, appropriate for my needs. The alternative, if there was to be any at all, would be a tiny flat I wouldn't be able to manage in, which would probably need adapting for me. That would cost the government a damned sight more than they currently pay out in housing benefit.

The thing that really angers me about what they are doing with the welfare system is that those of us who are genuine, who would like to work but are physically unable to do so, are being labelled as scroungers by a bloody Tory windbag who doesn't have the slightest clue about real life, and just to be fair, the other lot don't have a clue either. It makes me laugh that they want to deal with people claiming benefits etc, and we all know there are fraudulent claimers out there, but it's all quite rich coming from a government that was up to its eyeballs in expenses fraudsters not so very long ago. They could save the economy a fortune by cutting the number of MP's in half and making those that are left pay their own way in terms of cars, accommodation etc.
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Littlebuddha
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Re: Benefits and financial support « Reply #556 on: April 02, 2013, 04:50 PM »
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Agree with you 100% teejay, all the hooks and crooks are to be found in parliament. The majority could not live on benefits just listen to IDS. The is a big article in the Daily record this morning. He lives in a big mansion, drives an expensive sports car and earns a fortune most of us earn nowhere near what he has. He has the cheek to say on the radio talking to John Humphries that he could live on £53.00 a week what a lie. Someone should let him try it he would last about two days if that.
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blueberryhill
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Re: Benefits and financial support « Reply #557 on: April 02, 2013, 06:48 PM »
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This government makes me  vomit They are making the very poorest and the most disadvantaged pay for the mistakes of the very rich.
Signed the petition Haze, let's see IDS live on £53. duh
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DaveH
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Re: Benefits and financial support « Reply #558 on: April 02, 2013, 07:28 PM »
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The bedroom tax situation is a total crock if you ask me. The vast majority of people who will be affected will be disabled people, who need space to store equipment like wheelchairs etc, or need a spare room to enable someone to stay over in the event of illness etc.

As a disabled person living in a bungalow (part of a sheltered accommodation complex) I don't have an issue with paying the bedroom tax as such. What I have an issue with is the fact that someone like me has no choice in the matter. You either pay or you move. Well, with the best will in the world I live in a specially adapted bungalow, appropriate for my needs. The alternative, if there was to be any at all, would be a tiny flat I wouldn't be able to manage in, which would probably need adapting for me. That would cost the government a damned sight more than they currently pay out in housing benefit.

The thing that really angers me about what they are doing with the welfare system is that those of us who are genuine, who would like to work but are physically unable to do so, are being labelled as scroungers by a bloody Tory windbag who doesn't have the slightest clue about real life, and just to be fair, the other lot don't have a clue either. It makes me laugh that they want to deal with people claiming benefits etc, and we all know there are fraudulent claimers out there, but it's all quite rich coming from a government that was up to its eyeballs in expenses fraudsters not so very long ago. They could save the economy a fortune by cutting the number of MP's in half and making those that are left pay their own way in terms of cars, accommodation etc.

It really sucks. Bedroom tax is an outrage. I just wonder how much of the damage Labour will undo, or be able to undo, when they get in, which should be next election.

The annoying thing is, if people didn't vote against their own interests, there would never be a Tory government.
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DaveH
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Re: Benefits and financial support « Reply #559 on: April 02, 2013, 07:31 PM »
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I have no problem with genuine claimants, of which there must be very few, or else we're a nation with serious, widespread and worrying health problems.

It's the latter. One in four people suffer from a mental illness at some point in their lives.
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DaveH
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Re: Benefits and financial support « Reply #560 on: April 02, 2013, 07:41 PM »
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Of course there are those who claim disability benefits who are not entitled to them, but people have their focus completely in the wrong place. Economic crime costs £73 bn a year. It's the City where the real gamers of the system reside.
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Littlebuddha
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Re: Benefits and financial support « Reply #561 on: April 02, 2013, 07:49 PM »
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The Tories look after themselves and big business. You would think that people would know that or are they hiding and pretending not to know that.
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Hazybear
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Re: Benefits and financial support « Reply #562 on: April 02, 2013, 09:20 PM »
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That's the issue. How do you assess someone else's experience in order to determine whether they are genuine? Medical evidence can do so much to weed out the frauds, but then you're left with conditions that are either misunderstood or rife with ambiguity.

For example, how do you assess pain levels? These medical tests and questionnaires don't appear to understand that some conditions vary from day to day or even hour to hour. I may feel great one day and be fit to work, but what about the next day?

How can someone confidently apply for a regular 9-5 job when their medical condition is so unpredictable? That is an example of something that isn't taken into account because these people just can't relate.

Personally, I'm trying to overcome this issue by putting myself in a position to pick and choose based on my needs. Not everyone can do that, though.

This is it. As you said the Atos medical is a farce- my last report said that I could use my hands well enough to not be eligible because I handled a piece of paper!

The 'medical professional' also wrote in the report that my diagnosis/problem was a musculosketetal issue that effected my nerves- which is crock as I have a nerve problem (undefined) that then effects my nerves. The difference this makes on how the decision maker reads the evidence is massive and it's no wonder my claim was turned down based on that.
How are people like myself meant to honestly represent ourselves when those who are assessing us don't even put down the right diagnosis or understand the medical terminology we use??

Also my condition is variable, although now my good days are still fairly bad now. I'm not saying that I can't do certain things but I definitely couldn't be a reliable employee who could repeatedly perform tasks. I struggle to travel; can't move a lot but need to move regularly so the pain doesn't get worse from remaining in one position; regularly have days when getting washed and dressed is a challenge; don't sleep well so I'm often tired and not as on the ball as a job would require etc. Yet according to Atos and then the DWP decision maker- I am capable of working.
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Iluvandy
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Re: Benefits and financial support « Reply #563 on: April 02, 2013, 10:46 PM »
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It really sucks. Bedroom tax is an outrage. I just wonder how much of the damage Labour will undo, or be able to undo, when they get in, which should be next election.

The annoying thing is, if people didn't vote against their own interests, there would never be a Tory government.

But the Tories have always be good at divide and rule.   They set workers against people on benefit, private sector workers against the public sector, and the people fall for it.      
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Iris
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Re: Benefits and financial support « Reply #564 on: April 03, 2013, 12:42 AM »
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They are demonising people on benefits, the genuine claimants are being lumped in with the scroungers.  It was the government under Thatcher who promoted the unemployed to claim sickness benefit and come off the unemployment register and now that particular chicken has now come home to roost!  There is a horrific level of poverty in this country and I thought it was crass of the Chancellor of the Exchequer to give a speech from Morrisons Supermarket distribution centre, a bit of rubbing salt into the wound.  Shame on Morrisons for allowing this and I will not be shopping there in the future.
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Bevc
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Re: Benefits and financial support « Reply #565 on: April 03, 2013, 01:12 AM »
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It's the latter. One in four people suffer from a mental illness at some point in their lives.

I found this quote quite interesting and a quick look on google brought this article up.

http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/neilobrien1/100186974/the-remarkable-rise-of-mental-illness-in-britain/

Ed Miliband has been talking about mental illness, arguing that celebrities should stop demeaning the mentally ill. He talked about how it costs our economy tens of billions of pounds a year.

He's right that it's a really important subject, with big economic implications.

Between 1995 and 2005 about half a million extra people registered for Incapacity Benefit (IB) because of a mental illness, taking the total to about 1.1 million. (Shown in the top graph). Claims for mental illness grew even faster than other Incapacity Benefit claims.

Looking at specific problems, depression is the most common reason for claiming (accounting for 509,000 claims last year). 128,000 people claimed for an anxiety disorder, and while other big causes were neurosis (56,000) alcoholism (56,000), schizophrenia (53,000), retardation (49,000), severe stress (49,000), and drug abuse (42,000). And people have these problems for a long time. More than a quarter of those claiming IB for depression or anxiety disorders have been claiming for more than 10 years.

Think

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tamila
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Re: Benefits and financial support « Reply #566 on: April 03, 2013, 07:45 AM »
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Having worked in medical centres for the last 21 years I see both those who manipulate the system and those who do not use it as they should.  The number of people who claim disability and you then see them out doing very physical activities amazes me.  I have also seen people go to work who definitely struggle because they do not want to 'scrounge' as they put it.  It is going to be very difficult to sort this out as some people are very manipulative.  I must admit that the bedroom farce really is ridiculous but maybe it is somethiong like the poll tax which was totally misinterpreted by the councils etc.  Somd ething really needs to be done to address this problem but the vulnerable need to be protected.  We forget, of course, that David Cameron and co. cannot do all this on their own as the others need to agree and that most of these ideas come from the civil servants.  The programme 'Yes, Minister' is very close to real life.
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blueberryhill
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Re: Benefits and financial support « Reply #567 on: April 03, 2013, 10:16 AM »
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The number of mentally ill who end up in prison is also an outrage. There's just nowhere else for them to go. It was Thatcher who set about dismantling the mental health service.
Her government shut mental institutions and secure units. 
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Hazybear
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Re: Benefits and financial support « Reply #568 on: April 03, 2013, 11:05 AM »
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I found this quote quite interesting and a quick look on google brought this article up.

http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/neilobrien1/100186974/the-remarkable-rise-of-mental-illness-in-britain/

Ed Miliband has been talking about mental illness, arguing that celebrities should stop demeaning the mentally ill. He talked about how it costs our economy tens of billions of pounds a year.

He's right that it's a really important subject, with big economic implications.

Between 1995 and 2005 about half a million extra people registered for Incapacity Benefit (IB) because of a mental illness, taking the total to about 1.1 million. (Shown in the top graph). Claims for mental illness grew even faster than other Incapacity Benefit claims.

Looking at specific problems, depression is the most common reason for claiming (accounting for 509,000 claims last year). 128,000 people claimed for an anxiety disorder, and while other big causes were neurosis (56,000) alcoholism (56,000), schizophrenia (53,000), retardation (49,000), severe stress (49,000), and drug abuse (42,000). And people have these problems for a long time. More than a quarter of those claiming IB for depression or anxiety disorders have been claiming for more than 10 years.

Think



See I suffer from depression but that is something that effected me after my back being bad for about a year. So mine is directly linked to my current situation and not helped by the extra stress and worry various appeals and tribunals have caused me.
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Grabcopy
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Re: Benefits and financial support « Reply #569 on: April 03, 2013, 11:21 AM »
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I found this quote quite interesting and a quick look on google brought this article up.

http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/neilobrien1/100186974/the-remarkable-rise-of-mental-illness-in-britain/

Ed Miliband has been talking about mental illness, arguing that celebrities should stop demeaning the mentally ill. He talked about how it costs our economy tens of billions of pounds a year.

He's right that it's a really important subject, with big economic implications.

Between 1995 and 2005 about half a million extra people registered for Incapacity Benefit (IB) because of a mental illness, taking the total to about 1.1 million. (Shown in the top graph). Claims for mental illness grew even faster than other Incapacity Benefit claims.

Looking at specific problems, depression is the most common reason for claiming (accounting for 509,000 claims last year). 128,000 people claimed for an anxiety disorder, and while other big causes were neurosis (56,000) alcoholism (56,000), schizophrenia (53,000), retardation (49,000), severe stress (49,000), and drug abuse (42,000). And people have these problems for a long time. More than a quarter of those claiming IB for depression or anxiety disorders have been claiming for more than 10 years.

Think


It's a bloody joke.
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