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UK Coalition Govt: Success or failure?

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asimov
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Re: UK Coalition Govt: Success or failure? « Reply #105 on: June 03, 2010, 01:06 AM »
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I think it is wrong for a minority government to keep on working. It does not enjoy the support of the House.

I really hope this does not become law.

A minority government can't go on working if it does not have the support of the house, that is actually impossible, as no legisaltion could get through. It's only option would be to see if it could command support on an item by item basis and that would soon all through. The queen has the power to dissolve parliament and if the government could not govern and 55% of MPs would not put it out of it's misery then she would, believe me!
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Aileen
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Re: UK Coalition Govt: Success or failure? « Reply #106 on: June 03, 2010, 01:49 AM »
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The queen has the power to dissolve parliament and if the government could not govern and 55% of MPs would not put it out of it's misery then she would, believe me!
Can I once and for all dispel the idea that the Queen can dissolve parliament?  After the reign of Charles I, who tried to rule without one after summarily dismissing it, legislation was brought in whereby the monarch has the power to summon parliament and to prorogue it, but does NOT have the power to dissolve it.  This  can only be done at the request of the PM.
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Yamor
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Re: UK Coalition Govt: Success or failure? « Reply #107 on: June 03, 2010, 07:03 AM »
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Aileen, I don't think that is correct. There is no legislation to stop the queen doing it, just the accepted thing is she only does it on the advice of the prime minister, like all the other powers she has. So you are correct that the queen would never do it on her own, but she does technically have the power to.
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asimov
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Re: UK Coalition Govt: Success or failure? « Reply #108 on: June 03, 2010, 10:50 AM »
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Aileen, I don't think that is correct. There is no legislation to stop the queen doing it, just the accepted thing is she only does it on the advice of the prime minister, like all the other powers she has. So you are correct that the queen would never do it on her own, but she does technically have the power to.

Yes and she would if the government could not govern, though it would never come to that, as 55% of MPs would vote, including members of the government, if it could not command a majority in the house.
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Bevc
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Re: UK Coalition Govt: Success or failure? « Reply #109 on: June 03, 2010, 11:17 AM »
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Why is fixed terms bad? It was always up to the prime minister to dissolve parliament, now they're removing that power from him and giving it to parliament themselves - surely an improvement from the point of view of having open accountable government.

I don't think fixed terms are bad just that 5 years is.
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Daisy
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Re: UK Coalition Govt: Success or failure? « Reply #110 on: June 03, 2010, 04:04 PM »
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Harriet Harman: Half of shadow cabinet should be women


http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/politics/10225683.stm
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asimov
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Re: UK Coalition Govt: Success or failure? « Reply #111 on: June 03, 2010, 07:14 PM »
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Harriet Harman: Half of shadow cabinet should be women


http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/politics/10225683.stm

I for one, don’t believe in quotas and positive discrimination, the best candidate should get the job, regardless of gender or race. I am aware that the Scottish government encourages positive discrimination in the recruitment and promotion
of public sector workers and this can at times lead to resentment from whose who miss out on promotion. I feel that positive discrimination is discrimination and
and it is unfair if the candidate, who is best qualified, who puts in the most effort
is overlooked because he is a white male. The reverse side of positive discrimination is actually to discriminate against all the others. If the best candidates are women or come from the minority communities, then they should get the job but not to fill quotas.
It is a fact that the Labour party does have a large number of female MPs (using all women selection in various constituencies) and if they are the best MPs then yes they should be in the shadow cabinet but surely not just because they are women.
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Daisy
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Re: UK Coalition Govt: Success or failure? « Reply #112 on: June 03, 2010, 07:16 PM »
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 Good posting!
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Aileen
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Re: UK Coalition Govt: Success or failure? « Reply #113 on: June 04, 2010, 04:02 AM »
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Aileen, I don't think that is correct. There is no legislation to stop the queen doing it, just the accepted thing is she only does it on the advice of the prime minister, like all the other powers she has. So you are correct that the queen would never do it on her own, but she does technically have the power to.
Sorry, my history's a bit lacking here.  I'd forgotten that it was only during the reigns of Charles II and James II that parliament made sure that neither monarch had the power to dissolve it, although I think this was only a tacit agreement and that nothing was enshrined in law until the 1689 Bill of Rights.  The sovereign also has the right to sack the PM, although the last to do so was William IV in 1834, although in 1975 the Queen did sack Australia's PM Gough Whitlam.

It'll be interesting to see how Cameron and the Coalition will deal with their first non-parliamentary crisis, the Cumbria shootings.  It's OK saying that there shouldn't be a knee-jerk reaction to this incident, but, after Hungerford and Dunblane, the pressure will be on them to make gun ownership laws even tighter.
[ Last edit by Aileen June 04, 2010, 04:22 AM ] IP Logged
Ruthie
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Re: UK Coalition Govt: Success or failure? « Reply #114 on: June 06, 2010, 01:18 PM »
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I for one, don’t believe in quotas and positive discrimination, the best candidate should get the job, regardless of gender or race. I am aware that the Scottish government encourages positive discrimination in the recruitment and promotion
of public sector workers and this can at times lead to resentment from whose who miss out on promotion. I feel that positive discrimination is discrimination and
and it is unfair if the candidate, who is best qualified, who puts in the most effort
is overlooked because he is a white male. The reverse side of positive discrimination is actually to discriminate against all the others. If the best candidates are women or come from the minority communities, then they should get the job but not to fill quotas.
It is a fact that the Labour party does have a large number of female MPs (using all women selection in various constituencies) and if they are the best MPs then yes they should be in the shadow cabinet but surely not just because they are women.


I think you need to think about the impact on politics and not just those who are or who are not elected to the shadow cabinet as a result of a quota of this kind.   Westminister politics is still very male dominated and experience from other countries suggests that quotas - as a transitional mechanism - can help break that.    There were many complaints too of how much the election campaign was dominated by men. 
I think a 50-50 gender split in the shadow cabinet would be really good for politics - both in terms of how politics is done and also the policies that are deemed important.  Of course it doesn't follow that all women will do politics differently etc but the evidence suggests that when women create a critical mass it does begin to change things.  It would also mean more women with front bench experience so that when Labour is next in power there should be more experienced women who would be potential cabinet ministers.
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asimov
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Re: UK Coalition Govt: Success or failure? « Reply #115 on: June 06, 2010, 04:52 PM »
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I think you need to think about the impact on politics and not just those who are or who are not elected to the shadow cabinet as a result of a quota of this kind.   Westminister politics is still very male dominated and experience from other countries suggests that quotas - as a transitional mechanism - can help break that.    There were many complaints too of how much the election campaign was dominated by men. 
I think a 50-50 gender split in the shadow cabinet would be really good for politics - both in terms of how politics is done and also the policies that are deemed important.  Of course it doesn't follow that all women will do politics differently etc but the evidence suggests that when women create a critical mass it does begin to change things.  It would also mean more women with front bench experience so that when Labour is next in power there should be more experienced women who would be potential cabinet ministers.

Can I say at the outset, I have no objection to female shadow cabinet ministers, indeed it wouldn’t bother me if the majority were women, however on the condition that they were the best people and not simply there because of quotas or pandering to public bias. The Labour party already uses women only selection in some constituencies to ensure a fair number of women will have the chance of getting elected. However once they get there then the rest should be decided on merit. If the women elected to the shadow cabinet on quotas, were not up to the job, then what is the point of putting them into the cabinet, come the next labour government?

The election campaign itself was dominated by the presidential approach, the stress being on electing a PM and not a party, concentrating on the three male party leaders and more women cabinet or shadow cabinet members would not have altered this.

 I am not convinced that more women in the cabinet would lead to more caring family friendly cabinet, the people, men or women, who get into these positions, are usually very ambitious, self driven people from privileged backgrounds, with little real sympathy or understanding of the needs of ordinary people.

I know nothing of what has happened in other countries and you may be right but I just have little confidence in so called positive discrimination, which really just picks out another group to be discriminated against. I can see the point, in the police for example of deliberately recruiting some, black, Asian, Chinese or gay officers to work with communities, who mistrust the force or have difficulties with English.
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Re: UK Coalition Govt: Success or failure? « Reply #116 on: June 06, 2010, 09:21 PM »
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Cameron: 'Years of pain ahead'

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/politics/article7144906.ece


Anyone here work in the Public Sector?
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Ruthie
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Re: UK Coalition Govt: Success or failure? « Reply #117 on: June 06, 2010, 10:05 PM »
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Cameron: 'Years of pain ahead'

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/politics/article7144906.ece


Anyone here work in the Public Sector?

Yes I work in higher education and higher education is due for big cuts. I'm fortunate in that I'd already decided to retire but I fear for my colleagues - and also people who rely on public benefits and services. Nick Clegg gave an interview in the Observer today where he promised that the cuts wouldn't affect poorer people and areas but given that these rely on the public sector more than better off people and areas do it's difficult to see how they can be protected.
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Daisy
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Re: UK Coalition Govt: Success or failure? « Reply #118 on: June 06, 2010, 10:12 PM »
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For people with mortgages to worry about - what a nightmare.  It sounds like it is going to be very ferocious.  You will be very glad that you are soon to be out of it.
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Ruthie
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Re: UK Coalition Govt: Success or failure? « Reply #119 on: June 06, 2010, 10:17 PM »
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Yes I am and feel pretty lucky.   You're right it's going to be pretty tough - I remember the 1980s.
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