MurraysWorld  >  Chit Chat  >  Grammar & spelling howlers
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Grammar & spelling howlers

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Yeah, we Scots have got the most awful accents and habits in the entire English speaking world. You should hear some of the awful mutations my local dialect have come up with. You wouldn't actually recognise it as English sometimes.

Daisy you're so wonderful at pointing out what is wrong with all of us and all of the things we say about others. You're a fabulous asset to this forum and I'm glad that you've graced us with your presence. It's difficult to be in the presence of someone so perfect.

Can I also apologise to any Americans I may have offended with my previous comment. And I did actually mean common as in 'it happens all the time' not the negative connotations.

Afterall, the irony of a Scot calling anyone 'common' when we're all so unbelievably working class.

I think you were making a wild generalisation, not to mention being a bit unkind, to tar all Americans with the same brush, and that was the point I was making.

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What I actually meant was that Americans are the only ones I've ever heard doing it. But you were quite right in pointing out the errors of my ways. I would never want to offend anyone with sweeping generalisations. I just hate offending anyone with anything I say. I'm sure you understand exactly where I'm coming from when you try so hard to be tolerant yourself.
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Good lord, the tension is high is here!! lol
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From Joe's post -" We MW young'uns have probably benefitted from our parents and an innate sense of standards".  I see this word wrongly spelled on a regular basis even in places where it shouldn't be - benefited.
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Yeah, we Scots have got the most awful accents and habits in the entire English speaking world. You should hear some of the awful mutations my local dialect have come up with. You wouldn't actually recognise it as English sometimes.
As a Scot born and bred I take exception to that.  I agree a lot of Lowland Scots' accents aren't pretty, but a lot of us, myself included, are very capable of using perfectly recognisable English; and it's long been said that the best English is spoken north of Inverness.  Some English accents are equally ghastly - what about Brum, Geordie, Scouse and Cockney?
 
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After all, the irony of a Scot calling anyone 'common' when we're all so unbelievably working class.
I can only assume this comment is pure sarcasm.
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Aileen don't worry about it. You kinda missed the point of the whole post. Having lived in and around Aberdeen my entire life I'd take exception to my comments too. I actually happen to love the distinctive quality of the local dialect and can use both it and English quite well. Was kinda supposed to be tongue in cheek. I'm pretty sure Daisy got it.
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I said, "an hour" today.


doh
James will be after you. fainting

Seriously, I don't think I've ever heard anyone say "a hour".  Another quirk of the English language, and I can recall the usage of "a" or "an" before H being debated when I was at school.

Aileen don't worry about it. You kinda missed the point of the whole post. Having lived in and around Aberdeen my entire life I'd take exception to my comments too. I actually happen to love the distinctive quality of the local dialect and can use both it and English quite well. Was kinda supposed to be tongue in cheek. I'm pretty sure Daisy got it.
imsorry  Reading posts too quickly/humour not always coming across clearly in the printed word.

Anyway Doric isn't a dialect, it's a foreign language! lol
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It's because we pronounce hour as "our". So my mind tells me that the word begins with a vowel and it doesn't.
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Anyway Doric isn't a dialect, it's a foreign language! lol

I'd have to agree with that Aileen - but once you live in the area for a period of time, you get the hang of it.  However, town Doric (Aberdeen) and country Doric are two different things, and while I understand both, I definitely can't articulate either ...
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It's because we pronounce hour as "our". So my mind tells me that the word begins with a vowel and it doesn't.
Oh, right.  But that silent H is still an exception in English, although maybe it explains the Cockney accent where H is ignored, as in 'allo, 'ow, 'eaven, etc.

I'd have to agree with that Aileen - but once you live in the area for a period of time, you get the hang of it.  However, town Doric (Aberdeen) and country Doric are two different things, and while I understand both, I definitely can't articulate either ...
Didn't know there were distinct variations.  I've only ever been in that part of the world on holiday and sometimes felt that I needed an interpreter - like the time I asked a bus driver if his bus went to a certain place.  I got a lengthy response, not a word of which I understood, so I just got on the bus in blind faith, and fortunately got safely to my destination!
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I can't tell you how much I hate the typical New England accent. Holy ****, why do they pronounce car "cah" and Florida "Floridar"? Baffling. Rolling Eyes
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Didn't know there were distinct variations.  I've only ever been in that part of the world on holiday and sometimes felt that I needed an interpreter - like the time I asked a bus driver if his bus went to a certain place.  I got a lengthy response, not a word of which I understood, so I just got on the bus in blind faith!

I notice the differences because I live in the country, so it's a matter of self preservation to understand what's being said.  Of course these Doric speakers speak standard English very well - just depends on who they are speaking to and what kind of day they are having!  Sounds like your bus driver was not being very obliging!
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I can't tell you how much I hate the typical New England accent. Holy sh*t, why do they pronounce car "cah" and Florida "Floridar"? Baffling. Rolling Eyes

Think they're trying to sound more "English" than the "English" ...
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It's because we pronounce hour as "our". So my mind tells me that the word begins with a vowel and it doesn't.

I don't have a problem with 'an hour'. It's not the same as 'an historic', which starts with a consonant sound. In other words, if you pronounce the 'h', the word should be preceded by 'a'.
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I notice the differences because I live in the country, so it's a matter of self preservation to understand what's being said.  Of course these Doric speakers speak standard English very well - just depends on who they are speaking to and what kind of day they are having!  Sounds like your bus driver was not being very obliging!
He was a little surly ...
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