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Grammar & spelling howlers

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Daisy
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Re: Grammar & spelling howlers « Reply #120 on: October 17, 2010, 10:23 PM »
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I don't have any problems with either written or spoken English - but, mathematics - now that's a whole different kettle of fish.  Can't get 2 + 2 to regularly and reliably come to 4 every time ...
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Hazybear
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Re: Grammar & spelling howlers « Reply #121 on: October 17, 2010, 11:07 PM »
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Yeah, we Scots have got the most awful accents and habits in the entire English speaking world. You should hear some of the awful mutations my local dialect have come up with. You wouldn't actually recognise it as English sometimes.

Daisy you're so wonderful at pointing out what is wrong with all of us and all of the things we say about others. You're a fabulous asset to this forum and I'm glad that you've graced us with your presence. It's difficult to be in the presence of someone so perfect.

Can I also apologise to any Americans I may have offended with my previous comment. And I did actually mean common as in 'it happens all the time' not the negative connotations.

Afterall, the irony of a Scot calling anyone 'common' when we're all so unbelievably working class.

hug So glad you're around again!
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ljsmall
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Re: Grammar & spelling howlers « Reply #122 on: October 17, 2010, 11:55 PM »
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Don't forget the difference between farmer Doric and fisher Doric. I live in Peterhead and have done most of my life so I'm pretty fluent in the old fisher Doric. I speak English when I'm anywhere else but if I'm really comfortable in my surroundings you will find me slip into Doric. Ask amy, I've proper confused her on the odd occasion. I must say your experience can be quite typical Aileen. The number of times I overhear conversations and think to myself 'that would be complete double Dutch to someone from outside the area' is unreal. Chip shops, chemists, the doctor surgery. My favourite was when my mum, this week, in very plain English asked a guy to clarify a diversion. The reply that came barely had a word of English in it. I had to laugh! But I love Doric. There's something that sounds so twee and friendly about it.

hug So glad you're around again!

Aw, thanks. Good to be back!
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Joe
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Re: Grammar & spelling howlers « Reply #123 on: October 18, 2010, 12:00 AM »
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From Joe's post -" We MW young'uns have probably benefitted from our parents and an innate sense of standards".  I see this word wrongly spelled on a regular basis even in places where it shouldn't be - benefited.

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Grabcopy
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Re: Grammar & spelling howlers « Reply #124 on: October 18, 2010, 05:21 PM »
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How could I leave this unique word off my list?

Undoubtably.
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RositaK
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Re: Grammar & spelling howlers « Reply #125 on: October 19, 2010, 12:30 AM »
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I seen him do such and such instead of I saw him... Hate that.

Americans saying very fun instead of a lot of fun.
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Grabcopy
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Re: Grammar & spelling howlers « Reply #126 on: October 19, 2010, 09:51 AM »
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Just been reminded of another classic howler, thanks to the Daily Mail's comments section - misuse of 'literally', as in:

The world is literally your oyster
U2 literally blew the roof off the stadium
He literally charmed the pants off everyone
I was literally out of my mind with worry
The cars were literally flying down the road

This is justifiable homicide.
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Joe
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Boo hoo hoooooooo :'(

Re: Grammar & spelling howlers « Reply #127 on: October 20, 2010, 10:59 AM »
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Just been reminded of another classic howler, thanks to the Daily Mail's comments section - misuse of 'literally', as in:

The world is literally your oyster
U2 literally blew the roof off the stadium
He literally charmed the pants off everyone
I was literally out of my mind with worry
The cars were literally flying down the road

This is justifiable homicide.

Yep, that's a classic.

Former footballers posing as experts during half-time analysis of matches are the worst by far. Examples of attrocities that I have heard perpetrated:

"United have literally thrown the kitchen sink at them in that half." (There's a red card offence then if ever I saw one.)

"Yeah, they've done great, to be fair." (Why does everything need to be qualified with 'to be fair'? Why use 'great' instead of 'well'? Why use 'done' like that?).

"He's got his head on it and the keeper has made a great save." (I may be wrong, but isn't that all present tense? Shouldn't they be saying "the keeper made a great save?").

Winds me up no end.
Come the revolution, grammar abusers will be first against the wall.
Along with Tories. wink
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eira_arian
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Re: Grammar & spelling howlers « Reply #128 on: October 23, 2010, 07:15 PM »
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Ooooo bad spelling and grammar ANNOY ME SO MUCH!!!
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Grabcopy
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Re: Grammar & spelling howlers « Reply #129 on: March 08, 2011, 02:18 PM »
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Just a short note about the importance of the correct use of capitalisation.

Capitalisation is the difference between helping your Uncle Jack off a horse and helping your uncle jack off a horse.

You are welcome. I know you appreciate this reminder.
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iamabritt
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Re: Grammar & spelling howlers « Reply #130 on: March 08, 2011, 02:28 PM »
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I live in the south USA,where they mash on the gas pedal and where it behooves you to do something . Crazy.
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Daisy
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Re: Grammar & spelling howlers « Reply #131 on: March 08, 2011, 03:50 PM »
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Just a short note about the importance of the correct use of capitalisation.

Capitalisation is the difference between helping your Uncle Jack off a horse and helping your uncle jack off a horse.

You are welcome. I know you appreciate this reminder.

Ni-gellllllllllllllllll  shocking ...  lol
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Caz
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Re: Grammar & spelling howlers « Reply #132 on: March 08, 2011, 04:14 PM »
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Just a short note about the importance of the correct use of capitalisation.

Capitalisation is the difference between helping your Uncle Jack off a horse and helping your uncle jack off a horse.

You are welcome. I know you appreciate this reminder.
What's wrong with Uncle Jack that he couldn't get off his own damn horse?  w00t
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Joely
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Re: Grammar & spelling howlers « Reply #133 on: March 09, 2011, 09:32 PM »
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Ohhh, I can't cope with that pseudo-formal way people talk when a TV camera is pointed at them.

Me --> myself
You --> yourself
House --> property,
etc.

It's called Police Speak in my house...
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Mark
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Re: Grammar & spelling howlers « Reply #134 on: March 17, 2011, 07:34 PM »
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Found this interesting: http://www.lssu.edu/banished/current/default.html
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