Home Search Calendar Help Login Register
Did you miss your activation email?
Andy Murray vs Fabio Fognini, Thursday, Estimated time - 1:45pm BST - Discuss the match
MurraysWorld Discussions  >  General Community  >  Chit Chat  >  War Stories 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 5 ... 13 Go Down Reply
Author

War Stories

 (Read 5186 times)
robbie
Top Seed
*****
Posts: 6,417



Your goals minus your doubts equal your reality

Re: War Stories « Reply #15 on: January 07, 2011, 08:04 PM »
Reply

See? If you wouldn't have told me, could have kept me guessing....
Could be a double bluff. Think
IP Logged
AL1874
Top Seed
*****
Posts: 5,473

Gender: Male
Location: Edinburgh

What was I drinking last night?

Re: War Stories « Reply #16 on: January 07, 2011, 08:11 PM »
Reply

Pornic France, sorry I do not know were that is.

I know there is stereotypical jokes about the French and fighting, however in my home town is were the Free French Navy was based during WWII, a monument to them that looks over the estuary takes pride of place in the town.

Nice to meet you Smile

IP Logged
robbie
Top Seed
*****
Posts: 6,417



Your goals minus your doubts equal your reality

Re: War Stories « Reply #17 on: January 07, 2011, 08:14 PM »
Reply

Pornic France, sorry I do not know were that is.




France is in Europe if that helps.
IP Logged
AL1874
Top Seed
*****
Posts: 5,473

Gender: Male
Location: Edinburgh

What was I drinking last night?

Re: War Stories « Reply #18 on: January 07, 2011, 08:23 PM »
Reply

Thanks for that Robbie, I pay deference to your superior knowledge.

Smile
IP Logged
robbie
Top Seed
*****
Posts: 6,417



Your goals minus your doubts equal your reality

Re: War Stories « Reply #19 on: January 07, 2011, 08:25 PM »
Reply

My pleasure. Wink
IP Logged
Aileen
Murraymaniac
**********
Posts: 35,851

Gender: Female
Location: Edinburgh


Re: War Stories « Reply #20 on: January 08, 2011, 01:50 AM »
Reply

We have even started the stories yet!!! First name do for you? Or last? There is no reason not to, but I thought the whole idea of pseudos was to have a bit of cover and avoid unpleasentries of being politically "Incorrect" at times? If you were really up to it, you could find it.
Couldn't sleep last night thinking on this subject. I hope to sit down tomorrow and put a few details together.
This is the kind of thing I am hoping to address. Simple answer is yes. Hence, the repression of stuff. But I hope you will get, from my particular history, how it evolved that one can do this......and as I said everyone's story is different. Ask anyone who has been in a combat situation, and they will tell you; it is something which is hard to explain to someone has not experienced it but not necessary to explain to someone who has! I thought (only after the event), if you liked the experience, you are crazy!  But there are people who like it.
Never mind the real names stuff.  It's irrelevant.  I started off using a pseudonym, then thought "what the hell" - is somebody going to scour the whole of Edinburgh (population c. 448,000) looking for me if I rub them up the wrong way!  But everybody's different.  And anyway how many apparently real names aren't?

Sorry if this subject kept you off your sleep.  Guess it stirred up a few memories, both wanted and unwanted.  You don't have to tell us anything you don't want to.

I cannot imagine what it must be like to be in a combat situation.  As a kid I read loads of books by, and about, those who had fought in WWII, but in retrospect I realise they were heavily sanitised, even glamourised.  Everything was black and white - the British and their allies were the good guys and the Germans and the Japanese the baddies.  Nowadays it would be "warts and all" and every shade of grey, although if you want to get something like the true flavour of war, then read the poems about WWI by Wilfred Owen and Siegfried Sassoon, both of whom saw plenty of action in the trenches.

I suppose there are those who like it.  How else do you explain why so many men are, and always have been, desperate to get back into action after being wounded, sometimes seriously?  Is there a bit of thuggishness in these people that makes them want to kill or injure their fellow men, or do they simply enjoy the adrenaline rush which accompanies fear and the thrill of the hunt for the enemy?
IP Logged
Buhweet
Futures Level
**
Posts: 798

Gender: Male
Location: Pornic France


Re: War Stories « Reply #21 on: January 08, 2011, 09:21 AM »
Reply

Pornic France, sorry I do not know were that is.

I know there is stereotypical jokes about the French and fighting, however in my home town is were the Free French Navy was based during WWII, a monument to them that looks over the estuary takes pride of place in the town.


Nice to meet you Smile


Just below St. Nazaire on the coast. My wife was born there, we have a house there. I was born in New Orleans area USA. I'm no "cheese eat'en surrender monkey" Grounds Keeper Willy.
IP Logged
Buhweet
Futures Level
**
Posts: 798

Gender: Male
Location: Pornic France


Re: War Stories « Reply #22 on: January 08, 2011, 09:55 AM »
Reply

I cannot imagine what it must be like to be in a combat situation.  As a kid I read loads of books by, and about, those who had fought in WWII, but in retrospect I realise they were heavily sanitised, even glamourised.  Everything was black and white - the British and their allies were the good guys and the Germans and the Japanese the baddies.  Nowadays it would be "warts and all" and every shade of grey, although if you want to get something like the true flavour of war, then read the poems about WWI by Wilfred Owen and Siegfried Sassoon, both of whom saw plenty of action in the trenches.

I suppose there are those who like it.  How else do you explain why so many men are, and always have been, desperate to get back into action after being wounded, sometimes seriously?  Is there a bit of thuggishness in these people that makes them want to kill or injure their fellow men, or do they simply enjoy the adrenaline rush which accompanies fear and the thrill of the hunt for the enemy?
I've got a bit written, but will post a little later. Wanted to address the "why" they like it bit you touched on here and will later. The first time you anticipate going into fire, you can only guess what it will be like. You have to go on what someone has told you and trust those who have had the experience. The anticipation is intense like nothing else, but once you start seeing things around you flying and moving both extremly rapid but in after thought extremly slow a strange auto-pilot takes over. Like being in a accident. You have to be an animal, which is exactly what "they" want you to be. Flims such as "Platoon", "Apocalypst Now" and "Saving Private Ryan" are good for the visual flavor, but it is the smell that can never be recreated or forgotten. The smell of fuel, and smoke and blood and bodies two. three and even a week old. I flew in the CH 46 and it was my job to drop off the grunts, feed and supply them, pick up the wounded and dead after they were hit and whatever was left of the live ones once they were done and bring them back to base in DaNang.
After that first time and the first couple of times you realize that it is all luck and the adrenaline rush is like a drug....course when I was there, there were lots of help with pot. There were very few times I did not fly high back then, and most of the people I knew did the same. Hell, if you are going to get hit, you might as well go out happy, NO? For those who did not smoke they had beer for free: In my estimation it was much safer to have some pot head as compared to a drunk next to me. My best gunner used to fly every "hot mission" on blotter acid!!! Best damn gunner there was!!! But how could he do it, I have no idea!!!
The other thing "they" could like would be the comradery or sense of brother hood like nothing else. Your life depended on who your friends were, so choosing your friends and keeping them was important. However at the same time, you would not want to get too close to the new guys, cause if anyone would get it, it was usually the stupid and inexperienced ones....Or the "heros!!" would get you killed, because they think they are invincible. You stayed distant, even in friendship. As I think now, I remember faces but struggle to remember names, and that worries me. I remember situations and actions, but not their names, even as they were my "best" friends at the time! Isn't that strange??
IP Logged
Daisy
John McEnroe
*********
Posts: 19,792



Re: War Stories « Reply #23 on: January 08, 2011, 10:09 AM »
Reply

Oh Buhweet ....

The smell.  I never ever thought of that.  What a very vivid picture you paint - I just don't know how anyone can do what you did and still function afterwards.  I suppose, like all life altering situations, it fades into the wallpaper eventually, but its presence can still be felt.  I'm guessing you were fairly young when you were doing this?  What made you join the Marines in the first place?
IP Logged
Buhweet
Futures Level
**
Posts: 798

Gender: Male
Location: Pornic France


Re: War Stories « Reply #24 on: January 08, 2011, 10:16 AM »
Reply

Oh Buhweet ....

The smell.  I never ever thought of that.  What a very vivid picture you paint - I just don't know how anyone can do what you did and still function afterwards.  I suppose, like all life altering situations, it fades into the wallpaper eventually, but its presence can still be felt.  I'm guessing you were fairly young when you were doing this?  What made you join the Marines in the first place?
My 21st birthday was in DaNang....I was reminded the day after by a friend as we smoked on top of the bunker after a "hot zone" flight!! I was one of the "old guys"!!! In those days you could take your birthday off. So, I asked for the day off, but since it was the day "after" it was refused!!! Had to fly.....
Oh yeah, one of my favorite films was "Catch 22" Perfect rational for the officer Corps.
My birthday is on the 22 of Dec. And the why I was suckered into the situation will follow.
[ Last edit by Buhweet January 08, 2011, 10:20 AM ] IP Logged
Daisy
John McEnroe
*********
Posts: 19,792



Re: War Stories « Reply #25 on: January 08, 2011, 10:25 AM »
Reply

21 years old! So young - but anyone older just wouldn't do it.  And of course, as far as the military is concerned, it is young bright people that they are looking for, to do what you were doing - young with fast reflexes.  I've never seen Catch 22 and don't really watch war films - too distressing. 

22 December !!  So, you just had a birthday .... Many Happy Returns. Smile
IP Logged
Buhweet
Futures Level
**
Posts: 798

Gender: Male
Location: Pornic France


Re: War Stories « Reply #26 on: January 08, 2011, 10:34 AM »
Reply

21 years old! So young - but anyone older just wouldn't do it.  And of course, as far as the military is concerned, it is young bright people that they are looking for, to do what you were doing - young with fast reflexes.  I've never seen Catch 22 and don't really watch war films - too distressing.  

22 December !!  So, you just had a birthday .... Many Happy Returns. Smile
Read the book, it's better than the movie, which is how I did it!! It is not your standard "war movie" like the others I've mentioned above.
I also forgot a few smells which were really sigificant to me...the sweat (so damned hot even when it rained which was all the time in the rainy season) everyone constantly stunk!!!, jet fuel, oil, and hydraulic fluid (becuase I  flew and was constantly immersed in the stuff!) and the mold!!!! The mold was on everything!!! Because I work with Jet fuel, everytime I get a wift it brings me back.....
[ Last edit by Buhweet January 08, 2011, 10:56 AM ] IP Logged
Daisy
John McEnroe
*********
Posts: 19,792



Re: War Stories « Reply #27 on: January 08, 2011, 11:04 AM »
Reply

Read the book, it's better than the movie, which is how I did it!! It is not your standard "war movie" like the others I've mentioned above.
I also forgot a few smells which were really sigificant to me...the sweat (so damned hot even when it rained which was all the time in the rainy season) everyone constantly stunk!!!, jet fuel, oil, and hydraulic fluid (becuase I  flew and was constantly immersed in the stuff!) and the mold!!!! The mold was on everything!!! Because I work with Jet fuel, everytime I get a wift it brings me back.....

I wonder if the book is still readily available - I'll have to check Amazon - I just did and it is for £4.29, so I've added it to my Wish List to remind me to add it in to my next bundle.  Mold - I hate mold ... and it has its own smell too.  And of course, your current job will remind you of what has gone before ...
IP Logged
Buhweet
Futures Level
**
Posts: 798

Gender: Male
Location: Pornic France


Re: War Stories « Reply #28 on: January 08, 2011, 02:07 PM »
Reply

As the old saying goes Buhweet.......start from the very beginning........i.e. Whats your real name and take it from there. yes
Here you go Robbie...A beginning:
As a matter of background I should say how I managed to end up in the hole that was Vietnam. I welcome you to research names and places that I drop in this rambling history.
I was born on the “German Coast” Louisiana, a strip of land between the Mississippi River and the cypress swamp just west New Orleans.
My great-great-grandfather, Alexandre and three of his brothers served the Confederacy in the Civil War. See the San Francisco Plantation House: Their sister married the dude who originally designed and they started building it before he died from yellow fever in 1853. It then passed onto Valsin and his wife who completed it. Their father, Anacharsis Luminais, was a pilot on a French merchant ship who jumped ship in New Orleans in 1816 and married the daughter of a prominent Judge, Louis Achilles Trouard. It was in Trouard’s father’s house, now the “Hotel Crillion” in Paris, that the treaty the ministers of the King Louis XVI signed with the representatives of the new Continental Congress to aid the Colonies in revolt of England. Achilles Trouard went to Louisiana as a military attaché to coordinate the aid through Spain to the Colonies and served as a Captain.
Following up on Alexandre Luminais, he married Celeste Trepagnier. A descendant of one of the original settlers of the colony of Louisiana, whose great-grandfather, Pierre Trepagnier built and owned the “Ormond” plantation before he mysteriously disappeared on April 6, 1799. Pierre served with Achille as a lieutenant with the Spanish Army who fought the British in the “Mobile Campaign” during the American Revolution. His grandfather, Claude, an original settler who came from Canada with Iberville to Mobile, later moved with Bienville and established the city of New Orleans. In 1724, Bienville sent him to negotiate the release of a group of French colonists who were captured by the local Indians loyal to the Natchez who massacred the French in the village of the same name upriver of New Orleans. Claude made his way down to “Retour des Anglais” where the Indian village was located. It was there he was captured and slow roasted alive.
I was raised for the first ten years of my life by my grand-parents, Raoul “Happy” Luminais and Andrea Keller, his wife….why? I don’t really know. But as far back as I can remember, there were pictures of my uncles, in their Marine uniforms on the shelf. They were R.L., Earl and the husband of their sister, aunt Elda Mae, who was a sergeant: Uncle “Teeny”. They had all served in the pacific in WWII and had been to among others, Iwo Jima and Okinawa, probably the worst battles of the entire war for the US. But the funny thing is; I only heard them speak in very general terms that they were in “the war” dying to learn more details which never came. I loved playing Cowboy and Indians and soldier with my brother and handful of cousins. Vic Morrow’s “Combat” series was a popular TV program and I never missed it. Endless hours of watching old monster movies, War films… of course the US AWAYS! won and saved the world!! Wake Island, Guam, The Sands of Iwo Jima, and The Longest Day…. John Wayne, I think, was only killed once.
By my second year in high school I was thoroughly indoctrinated by American media and peer pressure. Two of my cousins and three of our best friends were drafted and all went into the Marine Corps.
My Grandpa Happy was in WWI, went to France but the only stories I gleaned from him was that he was lucky to have a skill as a plumber which kept him in the back lines, while as he put it, “I saw lots of boys go out, and not come back.” There was always a strange look and tweek in his voice when he thought and spoke about it.
By the last year of school, with my cousins in Vietnam, I was ready to get my string of ears.
A recruiter would regularly come by my Dad’s restaurant where I worked pumping gas to have coffee. One night hanging out with a bunch of friends, he talked us into coming down to sign up. Five of us at one time, a la “Deer Hunter.”  By then, out of school and with a low draft number, it seemed like a good thing to do so I could “choose a skill.” I chose aviation school and a four year term.
My first flight on an airplane, paid for the Uncle Sam, was exciting as was seeing California for the first time, riding the bus from the airport for a short ride to MCRD San Diego with a bunch of dudes herded by two sharp looking Marines in dress blue pants and kaki shirts as recruiters dress. I was soon to find out why we were herded as so much cattle.
Getting off the bus, (my best friend in high school and I were seated in the middle of the bus) we could hear the drill sergeant absolutely screaming at the top of his voice obscenities in combinations I could never imagine. I thought it very funny and as I exited the bus my laughter caught the attention of both my drill instructors. I became known as “Laughing Boy” from then on. I was literally picked up by the throat and carried to the “yellow foot prints” where this strange man said he’d better not see any yellow outside of where we were standing! I have a 9 and a half shoe, those foot prints were a good twelve or better….what’s a guy to do?
   Have you seen Jack Webb in The D.I.  and Paris Island films? Jack was a kitten compared to these guys! That’s when I whispered to my buddy “I think we made a mistake!” That was a mistake because these guys didn’t miss a thing I’m telling you! I received a karate chop to the front of my throat which came out’ta nowhere.
   These guys walked around, perfectly dressed, punching and strangling at will!!! I’m thinking, “Jack Webb never cursed and punched anyone like this!”
IP Logged
Mark
Murraymaniac
*
Posts: 53,066

Gender: Male
Location: London


Re: War Stories « Reply #29 on: January 08, 2011, 02:12 PM »
Reply

Ouch, my eyes - whatever happened to line breaks.
IP Logged
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 5 ... 13 Go Up Reply 
« previous next »