Home Search Calendar Help Login Register
Did you miss your activation email?
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 ... 10
 1 
 on: Today at 10:11 PM 
Started by Masaka - Last post by Fiverings
Oh, and the most likely outcome: turning a blind eye and business as usual. Europe needs the energy, Russia needs the cash. Neither really give a crap about the Ukraine, sadly.
  Agree with you there, but thankfully that also means that Ukraine is unlikely to progress beyond low-level (relatively) strife.

 2 
 on: Today at 10:05 PM 
Started by Masaka - Last post by Aileen
If he is, he better start investing in grid scale energy storage solutions. The problem with wind and solar is that they are inherently peaky supplies of energy. Wind provides power when... the wind is blowing. Solar, when the sun is shining.

The same applies to power demand - the amount of energy being drawn from the grid depends on a bunch of factors, including the time of day and the weather. In the UK, where air conditioning is a relatively unusual amenity, power demand tends to be lowest during summer days, and highest during winter evenings.

The peak in supply rarely coincides with the peak in demand in this country. To support this, you typically need a different energy source to provide base load - something that isn't dependent on the weather. In the UK, this is from nuclear, gas and, during the winter, coal (coal is restricted as it's highly polluting, so the energy companies prefer to use it during the winter when prices are highest)

What this all boils down to is that, while Scotland (and the UK as a whole) has huge potential reserves of wind energy, without grid storage solutions it's not necessarily going to make a huge amount of money.
Thank you for that explanation.  It would seem though that Salmond has every intention of pursuing his cherished idea of wind farms -

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/scotland/10760835/Scotland-has-more-than-half-the-UKs-wind-turbines.html

http://www.heraldscotland.com/news/home-news/wind-farm-extension-plans-approved.1406131387

 3 
 on: Today at 10:03 PM 
Started by Masaka - Last post by boogers
Oh, and the most likely outcome: turning a blind eye and business as usual. Europe needs the energy, Russia needs the cash. Neither really give a crap about the Ukraine, sadly.

 4 
 on: Today at 09:59 PM 
Started by Masaka - Last post by boogers
   This is well understood and has been the subject of much research and activity for years. I expect major European Infrastructure projects relating to this to start in earnest in the near future.  The crisis in Ukraine can only accelerate the process.

Indeed. The European DC supergrid being a good example of one such project.

*opens the Proceedings of the IEEE - special issue, Energy Storage (part 1: batteries and energy conversion systems)*

Redox flow batteries are pretty cool.

However, I think the immediate outcome of the Ukraine crisis will be an acceleration of unconventional hydrocarbon recovery, the reactivation of legacy hydrocarbon generation (see Germany and the resurrection of their horrible dirty lignite coal mining industry) and the construction of more LNG terminals.

 5 
 on: Today at 09:51 PM 
Started by Masaka - Last post by Fiverings
If he is, he better start investing in grid scale energy storage solutions. The problem with wind and solar is that they are inherently peaky supplies of energy. Wind provides power when... the wind is blowing. Solar, when the sun is shining.

The same applies to power demand - the amount of energy being drawn from the grid depends on a bunch of factors, including the time of day and the weather. In the UK, where air conditioning is a relatively unusual amenity, power demand tends to be lowest during summer days, and highest during winter evenings.

The peak in supply rarely coincides with the peak in demand in this country. To support this, you typically need a different energy source to provide base load - something that isn't dependent on the weather. In the UK, this is from nuclear, gas and, during the winter, coal (coal is restricted as it's highly polluting, so the energy companies prefer to use it during the winter when prices are highest)

What this all boils down to is that, while Scotland (and the UK as a whole) has huge potential reserves of wind energy, without grid storage solutions it's not necessarily going to make a huge amount of money.
   This is well understood and has been the subject of much research and activity for years. I expect major European Infrastructure projects relating to this to start in earnest in the near future.  The crisis in Ukraine can only accelerate the process.

 6 
 on: Today at 09:51 PM 
Started by eira_arian - Last post by boogers
This is interesting. Watching Nigel rail against the Daily Mail is like watching a Texan rail against the Republican Party.

 7 
 on: Today at 09:43 PM 
Started by Masaka - Last post by boogers
So it would seem Boogers, unless Salmond is intending to cover the entire country and the seas around it with unsightly and largely untried wind farms.

If he is, he better start investing in grid scale energy storage solutions. The problem with wind and solar is that they are inherently peaky supplies of energy. Wind provides power when... the wind is blowing. Solar, when the sun is shining.

The same applies to power demand - the amount of energy being drawn from the grid depends on a bunch of factors, including the time of day and the weather. In the UK, where air conditioning is a relatively unusual amenity, power demand tends to be lowest during summer days, and highest during winter evenings.

The peak in supply rarely coincides with the peak in demand in this country. To support this, you typically need a different energy source to provide base load - something that isn't dependent on the weather. In the UK, this is from nuclear, gas and, during the winter, coal (coal is restricted as it's highly polluting, so the energy companies prefer to use it during the winter when prices are highest)

What this all boils down to is that, while Scotland (and the UK as a whole) has huge potential reserves of wind energy, without grid storage solutions it's not necessarily going to make a huge amount of money.

 8 
 on: Today at 09:23 PM 
Started by Masaka - Last post by Aileen
Will there be no fracking in iScotland? Maybe if everybody votes Green?
http://www.scottishgreens.org.uk/uncategorized/harvie-challenges-salmond-on-fracking/
That's a good point - but thinking about it, pretty much what you'd expect. Hydrocarbons in the North Sea are petering out, so to maintain Salmonds dreams of being Norway, the only alternative is fracking.
So it would seem Boogers, unless Salmond is intending to cover the entire country and the seas around it with unsightly and largely untried wind farms.

However, according to an article in today's Telegraph -

SNP ministers are facing a dilemma over allowing fracking in Scotland after a report said it could deliver major economic benefits but the best shale gas reserves were in the country’s most populated areas.

An expert group commissioned by the Scottish Government found there are no significant technological barriers to the development of an "unconventional" hydrocarbon industry and that it could be extracted safely.

But it said most of Scotland’s coal bed methane and shale gas reserves are found in and around former coal fields and oil share fields, “which remain amongst the most densely populated parts of the country”.

Full story - http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/10997120/Fracking-possible-in-Scotlands-most-populated-areas.html

 9 
 on: Today at 09:16 PM 
Started by eira_arian - Last post by angiebabez
Ask for 5,000 I say!!

 10 
 on: Today at 08:35 PM 
Started by Masaka - Last post by boogers
I don't disagree with everything that Heseltine says, but find the secretive manner in which all this was done reprehensible.

Height of the cold war, yadda, yadda, but yeah, fair point.

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 ... 10