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Flat Murray falls to fluid Federer

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Re: Flat Murray falls to fluid Federer « Reply #45 on: March 04, 2012, 09:47 AM »
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Looking at the match once again and for the last time, I felt sadly that Andy's performance was almost reminiscent of his post AO slumps in 2010 and 2011; but a one-off slump.

He just did not turn up to play Federer. He almost seemed like a rabbit caught in Federer's headlights. Such a pity! Federer was there to be beaten by a Murray performing as he did against Djokovic.

Onwards and upwards towards Indian Wells and Miami.

Incidentally, where in California is Indian Wells? Where is the nearest major city?
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Re: Flat Murray falls to fluid Federer « Reply #46 on: March 04, 2012, 10:33 AM »
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Looking at the match once again and for the last time, I felt sadly that Andy's performance was almost reminiscent of his post AO slumps in 2010 and 2011; but a one-off slump.

He just did not turn up to play Federer. He almost seemed like a rabbit caught in Federer's headlights. Such a pity! Federer was there to be beaten by a Murray performing as he did against Djokovic.

Onwards and upwards towards Indian Wells and Miami.

Incidentally, where in California is Indian Wells? Where is the nearest major city?

Palm Springs, I believe. Although LA would be the nearest mega city.
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Re: Flat Murray falls to fluid Federer « Reply #47 on: March 04, 2012, 10:35 AM »
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Can anyone explain to me why Lendl won't be hooking up with Andy for Indian Wells and Miami? I thought that attending the majors and the masters events was part of his contract. Plus he lives part time in Miami Doesn't he? Words fail me...
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Re: Flat Murray falls to fluid Federer « Reply #48 on: March 04, 2012, 10:39 AM »
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Can anyone explain to me why Lendl won't be hooking up with Andy for Indian Wells and Miami? I thought that attending the majors and the masters events was part of his contract. Plus he lives part time in Miami Doesn't he? Words fail me...

Yes, I'm becoming increasingly concerned about how part-time this arrangement is, as I alluded to at the end of my match report.
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Re: Flat Murray falls to fluid Federer « Reply #49 on: March 04, 2012, 10:52 AM »
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I agree with Aileen's viewpoint over several posts. It was good for Andy to have the experience and match play of this tourney. I somehow felt that his real determination was not to the fore against Federer, it was as if he had done what he went there to do the day before when he beat Nole and before that Berdych and the final was a by-the way - he would have liked to win but if he didn't - so what? Perhaps this is a bit harsh but Nole and Berdych were the two players who have been his biggest 'bete noir' over the last year or so. We have often pinned a psychological label to Andy's losses but his wins too are tinged with the same. He was determined against Nole in the Aussie Open hence the super match and in Dubai he beat him when Nole was playing reasonably well, but Andy just kept pulling the ground from under him and he was the winner. Had he played as decisively against Fed maybe the outcome would have been different, although Fed himself did up his game to combat the threat that Andy posed.
We shall see but I was disappointed but very hopeful of a good year for him.
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Re: Flat Murray falls to fluid Federer « Reply #50 on: March 04, 2012, 01:41 PM »
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Yes, I'm becoming increasingly concerned about how part-time this arrangement is, as I alluded to at the end of my match report.

I think the agreement has been 20 weeks of Lendl's time as Lendl is busy with other activities.  I see this as all the GSs, + training blocks + remaining time allocated for Master Series (1000).  

So far, I am happy with this arrangement.  
1. Andy won at Brisbane. We can say that this is wholly due to Andy as Lendl couldn't do much in 2 days.
2. Lendl influence at AO SF was clearly visible where Andy on court behaviour was much better, combined with more agressive baseline hugging style and took Novak to the brink (Nole's coach words)
3. Andy 10 days training at Miami has clearly yielded fruit with the 71% first serve percentage to dispatch Nole in straight sets at Dubai.  Apart from the final, Andy first serve percentage was above 60% - a distinct improvement.

So onwards and upwards. Now Andy just needs to
1. Maintain the consistent 1st serve percentage
2. Raise the 2nd serve speed and placement (nearer to the edges and not in the safe centre)
3. Better/faster transition from baseline to net play to take advantage of attacking situations
4. Improve clay court play
....
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Re: Flat Murray falls to fluid Federer « Reply #51 on: March 04, 2012, 02:06 PM »
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Excellent piece from Peter Bodo with regards to Roger's performance over the last little while


He's getting to be like the guy who's still dancing with a lampshade on his head and crying, "Whoo-hooo!" while everyone else is played out and leaving the party.

Or like the ex-boyfriend who just won't go away — and just may end up marrying the fickle beauty who once dumped him. It may not be a very dignified way to describe Roger Federer, but for the great champions it isn't really about dignity, not primarily, anyway. It's about you know what. It's about winning.

And Federer has been doing an awful lot of that recently.

In fact, he's won 33 of his last 35 matches since he lost to Novak Djokovic in the semifinals of the U.S. Open and that was a match in which he was twice one swing away from advancing to meet Rafael Nadal in the final. The only matches Federer has lost since then were to Nadal in the semis of the Australian Open, and John Isner of the USA in a Davis Cup tie. The title he won today in Dubai (d. Andy Murray, 7-5, 6-4) is his fourth during that run.

Okay, that's the cue for all the haters to emerge from under the mossy stone bridge to brag about what No. 2 Nadal would have done to Federer, had he bothered to enter Dubai. Or for No. 1 Djokovic's partisans to shrug and claim their man just had one of those bad days when he lost in the semis to Murray.

Fair enough, but if nothing else it's downright mean-spirited not to tip your hat to Federer, the 30-plus year old 16-time Grand Slam singles champion and father of twins. These days, when Federer says, "Who's your daddy?" he's not just talking to his little girls. He's also addressing Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, Juan Martin del Potro, Andy Murray, and all the rest of them.

"There is no substitute to confidence," No. 3 Federer told the press after his creative demolition of Andy. "I've played great (lately)."

This title is not quite up there with Federer's win last November at the ATP World Tour Finals, but it eclipses those other three tournament wins he's had since last fall — and by a significant margin.The field in Dubai was loaded — only Nadal and clay dog David Ferrer were MIA among top 10 players. And let's be honest about this: Federer has needed to show that he can beat one of the other Big Four (Djokovic, Nadal and Murray) in a single-elimination tournament final — something he hadn't done until today since the fall of 2010 on his home turf, Basel (d. Nadal).

As impressive — and aggressive — as ATP No. 4 Murray was against Djokovic in the semis, Federer de-fanged him in the trophy match. Taking advantage of the premium the fast hard court put on quick- strike tennis and employing the versatility that can keep an opponent off-balance on so quick a surface, Federer taught Murray a valuable lesson — the faster the court, the tougher it is to play great defense, and to make that critical transition from defense to offense. If you can't pull that one off, you might as well improve your odds by going off to find a clay-court tournament somewhere.

A guy of Federer's age just isn't supposed to hogtie a rangy 24-year-old the way Federer did Murray — aren't the reflexes the first thing to go as you get older? What the Mighty Fed been doing on the court is nothing short of remarkable, and if Nadal or Djokovic want to do something about it, they can just show up opposite Federer in the draw.

Which they are likely to do, soon enough.

"It's not just that I've taken my chances," Federer mused today. "I really thought I played a good tournament here. . . That gives me hope that I can carry it over to Indian Wells and Miami."

Hmmmmm. . . it seems that a number of people might be thinking along the same lines.

Dubai has found a cozy niche on the calendar as the prelude to the two massive Masters 1000 events in the U.S., and the scorekeepers among you will remember that last year, Federer lost in the California desert to Djokovic, and in Miami to Nadal. Both matches were semis; Federer pushed Djokovic to three sets in Indian Wells, but he played perhaps the worst match of his career in that semifinal loss to Nadal — that is, if you can call standing flat-footed and waving the racquet in the general direction of the ball for about an hour "playing."

Very little has been heard from Nadal in recent weeks; rumor has it that he's working on a plan to take down his nemesis, Djokovic, after which he'll take over the world from a command center on a starship now orbiting the earth disguised as a team Babolat Peugot mini-van. Rumor also has it that Djokovic is a tired puppy, and has been overheard asking his coach, Marian Vajda, "Tell me again, why do I have to win every one of these tournaments again when I won them all last year?"

But just as Djokovic remains a huge problem for Nadal, Federer must rank as a major headache for Djokovic. Since the start of 2010, their head-to-head is 5-5, and they've played a lot of very close matches. Their games match up nicely, but not as predictably as either man's dovetails — for good or ill — with the game of Nadal.

Rumor also has it that Federer is already aboard a private jet heading for Delray Beach, where he plans to challenge the winner of tomorrow's final to play a "quick one" just for the heck of it before they all head off to California. Who knew being 30 could be so much fun? Whooo-hooo!


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Re: Flat Murray falls to fluid Federer « Reply #52 on: March 04, 2012, 04:51 PM »
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In Andy's post-match interview, he is asked about Lendl's input - the transcript is here: http://www.dubaidutyfreetennischampionships.com/News/Interview-Transcripts/Interview-Transcripts.aspx

I agree with Philip. I don't think we need to start worrying.
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Re: Flat Murray falls to fluid Federer « Reply #53 on: March 04, 2012, 04:51 PM »
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Not sure why we have to read a long song of praise to smugfed on a website for Andy Murray fans?
Anyway here's another take on smugfed: how about this for a classic federism*: 'Maybe Andy didn't serve his very best tonight, but maybe that comes through my good returning'.  Funny that isn't it given how brilliantly Andy served the previous day against the guy who is generally seen as the best returner on tour now.  
*a 'federism': arrogance thinly disguised in polite observations about his opponents.  Now I'm sure I can do better with the definition than that but not feeling inspired this rain-drenched afternoon  doh So if anyone can come up with a better definition .....

MP: many thanks for posting the interview transcript.  Thought it was very encouraging - both with regard to Andy's frame of mind but also Mr L's input.  I had thought it odd they'd not hook up in Miami and lo they are.  And I don't think Andy needs him there all the time - after all he was doing pretty well on his own for most of 2nd half of last year.  So a combination of time together backed up by phone calls seems fine.  I'd rather Lendl on a PT basis than most potential coaches on a FT on the evidence of his impact so far. So lots to celebrate and as Indy headline said 'Scot heads for America in good heart' and so he should. 
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Re: Flat Murray falls to fluid Federer « Reply #54 on: March 04, 2012, 05:26 PM »
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In Andy's post-match interview, he is asked about Lendl's input - the transcript is here: http://www.dubaidutyfreetennischampionships.com/News/Interview-Transcripts/Interview-Transcripts.aspx

Thanks MP - I hadn't seen those transcripts.

So what Fed actually said the other day about watching videos was: "more for just pleasure and looking at my own technique, seeing if I have to adjust anything".
 
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Re: Flat Murray falls to fluid Federer « Reply #55 on: March 04, 2012, 05:59 PM »
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Excellent piece from Peter Bodo with regards to Roger's performance over the last little while


He's getting to be like the guy who's still dancing with a lampshade on his head and crying, "Whoo-hooo!" while everyone else is played out and leaving the party.

Or like the ex-boyfriend who just won't go away — and just may end up marrying the fickle beauty who once dumped him. It may not be a very dignified way to describe Roger Federer, but for the great champions it isn't really about dignity, not primarily, anyway. It's about you know what. It's about winning.

And Federer has been doing an awful lot of that recently.

In fact, he's won 33 of his last 35 matches since he lost to Novak Djokovic in the semifinals of the U.S. Open and that was a match in which he was twice one swing away from advancing to meet Rafael Nadal in the final. The only matches Federer has lost since then were to Nadal in the semis of the Australian Open, and John Isner of the USA in a Davis Cup tie. The title he won today in Dubai (d. Andy Murray, 7-5, 6-4) is his fourth during that run.

Okay, that's the cue for all the haters to emerge from under the mossy stone bridge to brag about what No. 2 Nadal would have done to Federer, had he bothered to enter Dubai. Or for No. 1 Djokovic's partisans to shrug and claim their man just had one of those bad days when he lost in the semis to Murray.

Fair enough, but if nothing else it's downright mean-spirited not to tip your hat to Federer, the 30-plus year old 16-time Grand Slam singles champion and father of twins. These days, when Federer says, "Who's your daddy?" he's not just talking to his little girls. He's also addressing Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, Juan Martin del Potro, Andy Murray, and all the rest of them.

"There is no substitute to confidence," No. 3 Federer told the press after his creative demolition of Andy. "I've played great (lately)."

This title is not quite up there with Federer's win last November at the ATP World Tour Finals, but it eclipses those other three tournament wins he's had since last fall — and by a significant margin.The field in Dubai was loaded — only Nadal and clay dog David Ferrer were MIA among top 10 players. And let's be honest about this: Federer has needed to show that he can beat one of the other Big Four (Djokovic, Nadal and Murray) in a single-elimination tournament final — something he hadn't done until today since the fall of 2010 on his home turf, Basel (d. Nadal).

As impressive — and aggressive — as ATP No. 4 Murray was against Djokovic in the semis, Federer de-fanged him in the trophy match. Taking advantage of the premium the fast hard court put on quick- strike tennis and employing the versatility that can keep an opponent off-balance on so quick a surface, Federer taught Murray a valuable lesson — the faster the court, the tougher it is to play great defense, and to make that critical transition from defense to offense. If you can't pull that one off, you might as well improve your odds by going off to find a clay-court tournament somewhere.

A guy of Federer's age just isn't supposed to hogtie a rangy 24-year-old the way Federer did Murray — aren't the reflexes the first thing to go as you get older? What the Mighty Fed been doing on the court is nothing short of remarkable, and if Nadal or Djokovic want to do something about it, they can just show up opposite Federer in the draw.

Which they are likely to do, soon enough.

"It's not just that I've taken my chances," Federer mused today. "I really thought I played a good tournament here. . . That gives me hope that I can carry it over to Indian Wells and Miami."

Hmmmmm. . . it seems that a number of people might be thinking along the same lines.

Dubai has found a cozy niche on the calendar as the prelude to the two massive Masters 1000 events in the U.S., and the scorekeepers among you will remember that last year, Federer lost in the California desert to Djokovic, and in Miami to Nadal. Both matches were semis; Federer pushed Djokovic to three sets in Indian Wells, but he played perhaps the worst match of his career in that semifinal loss to Nadal — that is, if you can call standing flat-footed and waving the racquet in the general direction of the ball for about an hour "playing."

Very little has been heard from Nadal in recent weeks; rumor has it that he's working on a plan to take down his nemesis, Djokovic, after which he'll take over the world from a command center on a starship now orbiting the earth disguised as a team Babolat Peugot mini-van. Rumor also has it that Djokovic is a tired puppy, and has been overheard asking his coach, Marian Vajda, "Tell me again, why do I have to win every one of these tournaments again when I won them all last year?"

But just as Djokovic remains a huge problem for Nadal, Federer must rank as a major headache for Djokovic. Since the start of 2010, their head-to-head is 5-5, and they've played a lot of very close matches. Their games match up nicely, but not as predictably as either man's dovetails — for good or ill — with the game of Nadal.

Rumor also has it that Federer is already aboard a private jet heading for Delray Beach, where he plans to challenge the winner of tomorrow's final to play a "quick one" just for the heck of it before they all head off to California. Who knew being 30 could be so much fun? Whooo-hooo!


http://tennisworld.typepad.com/

Interesting piece AK400.  I just wanted to say that I was looking forward to Andy beating Fedlover, but while the right Andy turned up he didn't manage to stay aggressive, C'est la vie, c'est la guerre. 

I was probably a bit offensive about your man in earlier posts celebrating the win over the Djoker, so I want to say Well done to him now after his win  He always turns up and almost always plays the perfect game for the occasion, as he did yesterday. 

I don't feel to down about Andy's performance, because I think the previous 2 matches were bigger for Andy, but that is to take nothing away from Fedlover.  His tennis was superb.  The friend I was watching the match with and I both felt that Lendl will enjoy using the match as a coaching tool.  Basically, whenever he lost aggresion he began to haemmorage points.  He also went AWOL at the end of the first set after a couple of poor shots and didn't really recover until well into the 2nd set - that's too long.  It's not so much losing focus occasionally, everyone does that, Fedlover himself a game or two before, but it's how long you stay distracted. 

A timely lesson now could make the difference this year.  Go Andy, - oh and well played Fedlover.   woohoo
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Re: Flat Murray falls to fluid Federer « Reply #56 on: March 04, 2012, 06:17 PM »
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Nole's H2H v Fed since Dubai last year is 3-1. I believe Rafa's is 4-1. Fed just had perfect scheduling on his favourite surface and an easy draw, let's just see how this year unfolds b4 Fed fans do any premature celebrating..
Now back to Andy! In spite of being well under par and Fed playing at the top of his game, this was no whitewash and Andy managed to break Fed's serve.
Onwards and upwards we go yay
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Re: Flat Murray falls to fluid Federer « Reply #57 on: March 04, 2012, 06:37 PM »
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I think the agreement has been 20 weeks of Lendl's time as Lendl is busy with other activities.  I see this as all the GSs, + training blocks + remaining time allocated for Master Series (1000).  

So far, I am happy with this arrangement.  
1. Andy won at Brisbane. We can say that this is wholly due to Andy as Lendl couldn't do much in 2 days.
2. Lendl influence at AO SF was clearly visible where Andy on court behaviour was much better, combined with more agressive baseline hugging style and took Novak to the brink (Nole's coach words)
3. Andy 10 days training at Miami has clearly yielded fruit with the 71% first serve percentage to dispatch Nole in straight sets at Dubai.  Apart from the final, Andy first serve percentage was above 60% - a distinct improvement.

So onwards and upwards. Now Andy just needs to
1. Maintain the consistent 1st serve percentage
2. Raise the 2nd serve speed and placement (nearer to the edges and not in the safe centre)
3. Better/faster transition from baseline to net play to take advantage of attacking situations
4. Improve clay court play
....
Thanks Philip.  Yes, I'd understood the same about the arrangement with Lendl.   Also how anyone can possibly say that Andy has reverted to where he was in the last two years, however briefly, is a mystery to me!

Aileen, I take your point about having the chance to play Djoko and Fed, there was a benefit in that. However, I fail to see what jet-lag has to do with professionalism and experience.  By going from the US to Dubai and back in the space of a fortnight Andy's body has to cope with disruption twice in a very short space of time - that takes it's toll no matter how professional or experienced you are.
Because tennis players, like many people who have to travel around the world frequently (think about airline pilots and crews), use lightboxes and take melatonin tablets or sleeping pills to "fool" their brains into thinking it's either time to wake up or to go to sleep in order to alleviate the symptoms of jetlag.  Andy himself has talked about this, so hopefully he'll be fine, although I do realise some people are affected more badly by jetlag than others, and Andy seems to be one of them.   At least I understand he should be in LA by now where he'll have a chance to settle down before IW, unlike Fed who's reportedly playing in an expo tomorrow - although where seems to be uncertain.  I'd heard it was NY, but according to AK it's Delray, but maybe he had to fly to NY first to get to Delray.  So who knows, or cares!
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Re: Flat Murray falls to fluid Federer « Reply #58 on: March 04, 2012, 07:18 PM »
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Perhaps smugfed could just fly round and round in his little private jet - though not very good for the environment I accept.
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Re: Flat Murray falls to fluid Federer « Reply #59 on: March 04, 2012, 07:37 PM »
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It  would be worth it to keep him out of the way.  Being a supreme being, the heavens are his natural environment after all!
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