Home Search Calendar Help Login Register
Did you miss your activation email?
MurraysWorld Discussions  >  Murray Community  >  News  >  Post reply ( Re: Murray opens 2013 with 25th title
Post reply
Warning: this topic has not been posted in for at least 120 days.
Unless you're sure you want to reply, please consider starting a new topic.
Name:
Subject:
BoldItalicizedUnderlineStrikethrough|GlowShadowMarquee|Preformatted TextLeft AlignCenteredRight Align|Horizontal Rule|Font SizeFont Face
Insert FlashInsert ImageInsert Hyperlink|Insert TableInsert Table RowInsert Table Column||Insert CodeInsert Quote|Insert List
confused hug shocking wub Whistle cmon yeah yay w00t nervous pray clap Think Rolling Eyes doh Little tongue man [more]
Image Verification:
Type the letters shown in the picture
You should read 5 characters in this image.


Type the letters shown in the picture

shortcuts: hit alt+s to submit/post or alt+p to preview



Topic Summary
Posted on: January 11, 2013, 06:59 PM
Posted by: Ruthie
Oh Caroline how awful for you but so glad that finding MW has helped in however small a way.
Posted on: January 10, 2013, 09:37 PM
Posted by: Connor
My thoughts and prayers go out to Ross and his family and I hope that he is able to recover and go back to the thing he loves doing best and that's playing great tennis again soon. I know from experience how devestating a time it must be for them all.I am the eldest of five and12years ago my youngest brother well the baby of the family as we always called him because he was the youngest was diagnosed with leukemia. Within 6months of the diagnosis he passed away. Destroyed us all completely life for us that day changed forever. He was 37years old at times I found it harder to cope because being the oldest I always thought why him and not me.It changed my life forever and me myself as a person.Sometimes even now I suffer terrible depression eventually I had a break down.But all I can hope is that its made me a better person.And finding MW was a true lifesaver for me and I mean that in the nicest possible way.

I'm on the same wavelength as you. Before my grandma passed away last year I wasn't (and I'm not proud to say this) a very sensitive person. In fact I was rather arrogant towards certain situations and that made me feel bad about not only myself but life. My grandma's passing taught me a thing or two and I'm a changed man now. God bless my grandma *cries*.
Posted on: January 10, 2013, 09:31 PM
Posted by: scotnadian
For Caroline: hug
Posted on: January 10, 2013, 09:19 PM
Posted by: caroline
My thoughts and prayers go out to Ross and his family and I hope that he is able to recover and go back to the thing he loves doing best and that's playing great tennis again soon. I know from experience how devestating a time it must be for them all.I am the eldest of five and12years ago my youngest brother well the baby of the family as we always called him because he was the youngest was diagnosed with leukemia. Within 6months of the diagnosis he passed away. Destroyed us all completely life for us that day changed forever. He was 37years old at times I found it harder to cope because being the oldest I always thought why him and not me.It changed my life forever and me myself as a person.Sometimes even now I suffer terrible depression eventually I had a break down.But all I can hope is that its made me a better person.And finding MW was a true lifesaver for me and I mean that in the nicest possible way.
Posted on: January 10, 2013, 08:45 PM
Posted by: caroline
I have great faith in Andy doing really really well at this years AO.Am really looking forward to the tournament starting, can't wait to start watching him play in a grandslam again. yay
Posted on: January 10, 2013, 08:36 PM
Posted by: Aileen
Going back to Ross Hutchins, I was reading an article about him on the text service on Sky (I think) this morning. He begins his chemotherapy today, so I do wish him well with that. Also, in the article he was explaining the circumstances in which his Lymphoma was discovered. I've not yet looked for the article on the net, but I'll try to summarise. He explained that he'd been getting some back pain and they were looking into the possibility of a problem with his kidneys. When tests on his kidneys came back clear they investigated his chest, he was found to have pneumonia and his specialist discovered that one of the lymph glands in his chest, near his heart, was enlarged. When Ross asked what the problem could be he was told that it could be an infection, or it could be a lymphoma. Ross said there was something in the specialist's voice, he knew she believed it was a lymphoma. Anyway, he had a biopsy and had to wait for the results - that must have been so tough - and was told just a couple of days after Christmas that he has Hodgkins Lymphoma.

I have to say that I found the article very moving. It seems unimaginable to me that something that was manifesting as a back problem could have turned out to be cancer, especially in a young, fit man. Then again, I'm reminded of my niece. Her lump was dismissed initially as 'probably hormones'. I'm just so glad for Ross that his specialist appears to have been on the ball, so to speak.
Ross said that he was told he'd probably had the cancer for 18 months, and, as you say, it's difficult to accept that back pains in a fit young person could have turned out to be this.  Probably just as well we don't know what's roaming around inside our bodies!  Also I'm horrified that any member of the medical profession could be so negligent as to dismiss the presence of a lump so lightly, regardless of a person's age or sex, but sadly that sort of thing does seem to happen from time to time.  I know the friend of mine who died from a brain tumour was told for months that her constant blinding headaches were due to "stress", despite the fact that she didn't work, had a happy marriage and a two year old daughter who was extremely good-natured and gave her very little trouble


for all those rightly concerned about how Ross himself is feeling and who are in UK apparently there's an interview with him on Radio 5 live at 7.30 this evening, which I imagine will go on the iplayer afterwards.
I greatly admire Ross's courage in speaking out, but I sincerely hope that the media leave him alone now.
Posted on: January 10, 2013, 06:49 PM
Posted by: Ruthie
for all those rightly concerned about how Ross himself is feeling and who are in UK apparently there's an interview with him on Radio 5 live at 7.30 this evening, which I imagine will go on the iplayer afterwards.
Posted on: January 10, 2013, 04:10 PM
Posted by: Connor
thumb up Well said, M.F.!

I'm sure your old Granny would be proud as punch hearing you say that and I bet you just put a big smile on her face.

Thanks Tom Smile

To MuzzaFan : hug

Thanks Linda Smile

From me too!! grouphug

Thanks Zarfeen Smile
Posted on: January 10, 2013, 03:43 PM
Posted by: Sabine
To MuzzaFan : hug

From me too!! grouphug
Posted on: January 10, 2013, 02:29 PM
Posted by: scotnadian
To MuzzaFan : hug
Posted on: January 10, 2013, 12:46 PM
Posted by: tomthoms
I was rather tuned in and close with my grandma's cancer treatment routine before her death last April. I can truly say from a somewhat personal experience that some of the strongest of us come from experiences such as cancer. She told me soon after her third bout of chemotherapy that she 'felt invincible', and to be fair I'm some what glad she did, because she knew she wasn't going to live for much longer, but she knew she coud show one last burst of life, and I respect her even now in every shape or form for that, because now when I am stretched to the limits with the challenges of life I recite her words, and I myself feel invincible.

R.I.P. Grandma.

 thumb up Well said, M.F.!

I'm sure your old Granny would be proud as punch hearing you say that and I bet you just put a big smile on her face.
Posted on: January 10, 2013, 12:32 PM
Posted by: teejay1
Well put, TJ, and very true.  Fortunately these days there's a lot of psychological as well as medical support around for cancer sufferers, and I believe too that there are now drugs which can help alleviate the worst side-effects of chemo.

I sincerely hope that your niece is getting all the help she can.  I know she is getting it from you, and probably from friends and other family members as well, but outside support is needed too.

I've no idea where your niece lives, but I wonder if she has heard of Maggie's Centres?  These Centres, the first of which was opened in Edinburgh in 1996, are a network of drop-in centres in Great Britain, which aim to help anyone who has been affected by cancer. They are not intended as a replacement for conventional cancer therapy, but as a caring environment that can provide support, information and practical advice. They are located nearby, but are separate from, existing NHS hospitals.  In addition, there is also now an free online Centre.  I've heard nothing but praise from those who have used them, especially the chance they give them to share experiences with other cancer sufferer.  For full information - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maggie's_Centres

Hi Aileen and all,

Thanks for your kind words about my niece. She is, thank goodness, hopefully on the road to recovery now. She's finished her chemo and starts radiotherapy next month, but hopefully, once that is done, she will be able to begin putting it all behind her and moving forward. I do hope so.

I will tell my niece about the Maggie's Centre's. We're in Worcester, so even if it isn't around locally it should be on the net. I'd never heard of them.

The worst of it with my niece is that her aunt on the other side of the family, her Mum's side, was diagnosed just prior to my niece and didn't come through. Her cancer was horribly aggressive and just couldn't be stopped. I'm sure it would do my niece good to talk to someone about all that, as much as her own situation, so I will let her know what you have told me, thanks.

Going back to Ross Hutchins, I was reading an article about him on the text service on Sky (I think) this morning. He begins his chemotherapy today, so I do wish him well with that. Also, in the article he was explaining the circumstances in which his Lymphoma was discovered. I've not yet looked for the article on the net, but I'll try to summarise. He explained that he'd been getting some back pain and they were looking into the possibility of a problem with his kidneys. When tests on his kidneys came back clear they investigated his chest, he was found to have pneumonia and his specialist discovered that one of the lymph glands in his chest, near his heart, was enlarged. When Ross asked what the problem could be he was told that it could be an infection, or it could be a lymphoma. Ross said there was something in the specialist's voice, he knew she believed it was a lymphoma. Anyway, he had a biopsy and had to wait for the results - that must have been so tough - and was told just a couple of days after Christmas that he has Hodgkins Lymphoma.

I have to say that I found the article very moving. It seems unimaginable to me that something that was manifesting as a back problem could have turned out to be cancer, especially in a young, fit man. Then again, I'm reminded of my niece. Her lump was dismissed initially as 'probably hormones'. I'm just so glad for Ross that his specialist appears to have been on the ball, so to speak.

Ross also goes on to talk a bit about what the time in between getting the diagnosis and doing something about the problem has been like. Understandably, it does sound like he has had some tough times, but again, he concludes by sounding positive and talking about wanting to be back playing again as soon as he is able.
Posted on: January 10, 2013, 12:14 AM
Posted by: Aileen
Sorry if the comment caused you to trawl away for the comment to report it Aileen, I just find cancer a very sensitive subject and things like that can get me slightly angry regardless of the intent. I also found your response to my comment rather comforting. Smile
I'm glad it did, MF.

Fortunately I didn't have far to look for that particular person's post, but you know now what to do when you spot anyone advertising, something which, quite rightly, infringes the rules of this forum.
Posted on: January 09, 2013, 11:39 PM
Posted by: Connor
True, but a lot of posts were still made after that was known.  Anyway life's too short to spend time arguing - and sadly there does seem to have been a lot of that on here in the last few days.  I'm sure though that the AO will now focus minds firmly elsewhere.
hug

My mother, who always took great pride in her appearance, insisted on visiting the hairdresser the day before she was due to be admitted to hospital so that she would "look good", even although the stomach cancer made her look like she literally was expecting twins and she knew she didn't have long to live, but maybe when you've reached that stage then something does kick in?  Think



Sorry if the comment caused you to trawl away for the comment to report it Aileen, I just find cancer a very sensitive subject and things like that can get me slightly angry regardless of the intent. I also found your response to my comment rather comforting. Smile
Posted on: January 09, 2013, 10:47 PM
Posted by: Bevc
True, but a lot of posts were still made after that was known.  Anyway life's too short to spend time arguing - and sadly there does seem to have been a lot of that on here in the last few days.  I'm sure though that the AO will now focus minds firmly elsewhere.
hug

No worries. Very Happy

Posted on: January 09, 2013, 10:46 PM
Posted by: Aileen
^ I find that somewhat disrespectful when in the middle of a conversation about cancer. Please post on another site.
Thanks for drawing attention to that MF, as I missed it.  Now been reported to moderator as advertising, so if you ever see anything like that again - and these posters aren't fussy about where they operate, it could be random anyway (clearly this one doesn't even know this is a tennis website) - then please use that facility (at bottom RH corner of their post) and it'll be removed a.s.a.p.

And that's it - it's gone now. Smile
Posted on: January 09, 2013, 10:07 PM
Posted by: Aileen

Before we knew that it was Ross.
True, but a lot of posts were still made after that was known.  Anyway life's too short to spend time arguing - and sadly there does seem to have been a lot of that on here in the last few days.  I'm sure though that the AO will now focus minds firmly elsewhere.

I was rather tuned in and close with my grandma's cancer treatment routine before her death last April. I can truly say from a somewhat personal experience that some of the strongest of us come from experiences such as cancer. She told me soon after her third bout of chemotherapy that she 'felt invincible', and to be fair I'm some what glad she did, because she knew she wasn't going to live for much longer, but she knew she coud show one last burst of life, and I respect her even now in every shape or form for that, because now when I am stretched to the limits with the challenges of life I recite her words, and I myself feel invincible.

R.I.P. Grandma.
hug

My mother, who always took great pride in her appearance, insisted on visiting the hairdresser the day before she was due to be admitted to hospital so that she would "look good", even although the stomach cancer made her look like she literally was expecting twins and she knew she didn't have long to live, but maybe when you've reached that stage then something does kick in?  Think

Posted on: January 09, 2013, 09:59 PM
Posted by: Connor
^ I find that somewhat disrespectful when in the middle of a conversation about cancer. Please post on another site.
Posted on: January 09, 2013, 09:49 PM
Posted by: Connor
I was rather tuned in and close with my grandma's cancer treatment routine before her death last April. I can truly say from a somewhat personal experience that some of the strongest of us come from experiences such as cancer. She told me soon after her third bout of chemotherapy that she 'felt invincible', and to be fair I'm some what glad she did, because she knew she wasn't going to live for much longer, but she knew she coud show one last burst of life, and I respect her even now in every shape or form for that, because now when I am stretched to the limits with the challenges of life I recite her words, and I myself feel invincible.

R.I.P. Grandma.
Posted on: January 09, 2013, 09:42 PM
Posted by: Bevc
Incidentally I've read through all the posts about how much we all commiserate with Andy and each other, but, unless I've missed it, I don't think there's been a comment about the effect this must be having on Ross himself.  Going by what I've heard from cancer sufferers, including an office colleague who was also diagnosed with HL, he must have been in a state of total shock, and probably denial, when he got the news, and these feelings could still be with him.  He might have sounded cheerful and positive in his tweet but he's got a long hard road ahead of him which could well test him to the limit at times.  I hope and pray that he will find the inner strength to enable him to cope.


Before we knew that it was Ross.


You mean that they have a life and are humans? Always have, and will never judge a loss because as Andy has just proved, other things are more important than tennis.

Positive vibes to get well soon to Andy' s friend and anyone else that needs it.