MurraysWorld  >  Chit Chat  >  The future of British politics
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The future of British politics

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Can't read it - paywall.
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I read it. Another crap article from what is now a ludicrous comic (Chris Giles is a joke!) but once used to be a sensible newspaper of record.
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Can't read it - paywall.

Apologies, here is some text from it:


'At a time of shortages, we are certainly not short of gloomy economic forecasts. The Resolution Foundation think-tank notes that average real earnings have fallen by 7 per cent since a year ago and predicts that earnings will take four or five years to recover to the levels of January 2022.

Yet if the forecasts are bad, it is the scene in the rear-view mirror that is truly horrifying. The British economy is in a generation-long slough of despond, a slow-burning economic catastrophe. Real household disposable income per capita has barely increased for 15 years.

This is not normal. Since 1948, this measure of spending power reliably increased in the UK, doubling every 30 years. It was about twice as high in 1978 as in 1948 and was in touching distance of doubling again by 2008, before the financial crisis intervened. Today, it’s back at those pre-crisis levels.

Go back and look for historical precedents for this, and you will not find much. In the National Institute Economic Review, economic historians Nick Crafts and Terence Mills examined the growth in labour productivity over the very long run. (This is defined as the total output of the UK economy divided by the total number of hours worked; labour productivity is closely connected to material standards of living.) They do find worse runs of performance — 1760 to 1800 was not much fun — but none within living memory. Nowhere in 260 years of data do they find a sharper shortfall from the previous trend. The past 15 years have been a disappointment on a scale that previous generations of British economists could hardly have imagined.


Many people struggle to pay for the basics. A large survey conducted by the Resolution Foundation in late November found that about a quarter of people said they couldn’t afford regular savings of £10 a month, couldn’t afford to spend small sums on themselves, couldn’t afford to replace electrical goods and couldn’t afford to switch on the heating when needed. Three years ago, only an unlucky few — between 2 and 8 per cent — described themselves as having such concerns over spending. More than 10 per cent of respondents said that at times over the previous 30 days, they’d not eaten when hungry because they didn’t have money for food.

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The British economy is in a generation-long slough of despond, a slow-burning economic catastrophe. Real household disposable income per capita has barely increased for 15 years.

The comic neglects to point out that this is a problem afflicting all western European developed nations.



Every single country on that graph, with the exception of the US, has broken from the pre-financial crisis trend.

Why is this important? It strongly suggests that this isn't a British problem, or even a British Tory problem. This is therefore more concerning than the myopic British declinism peddled by the pink pages.
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Mmm



* FkbkdG-WIAU6W6z.jpeg.jpg (42.08 KB, 470x1024 - viewed 322 times.)
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lol, I wondered if that chart would make an appearance. It's heavily cherry-picked and uses inaccurate compartors.

Given that, presumably you believe that this is a uniquely British phenomenon?
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lol, I wondered if that chart would make an appearance. It's heavily cherry-picked and uses inaccurate compartors.


So you have asserted, but not demonstrated.  No big deal though, there is a large amount of knock-about with such stuff of course.
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I know you'd all been wondering what happened to her Smile

https://www.politico.com/news/magazine/2023/01/30/liz-truss-republican-party-00080280?utm_source=POLITICO.EU&utm_campaign=261131fe3c-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2023_01_31_03_56&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_10959edeb5-261131fe3c-%5BLIST_EMAIL_I
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Funny in retrospect that maybe Truss and Kwarteng's ideas wern't so mad after-all.
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Well, Keith Joseph was known as the 'mad monk' in the 1970s before his economic ideas became...mainstream. Similarly the  1980s 'loony left' ideas on LBG rights, environmentalism and making deals with Irish republicans.
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DUP, ERG, ffs
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Raab the bully resigns but claims two of the findings against him were 'flawed'.
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Yes, good riddance. I was not shocked when the stories about him appeared.
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Raab the bully resigns but claims two of the findings against him were 'flawed'.

Have you read the report? There were only two findings against him.

In Raabs own words:

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After answering questions for 17 hours, the inquiry found against me on two issues. First, as Foreign Secretary, I made changes to the personnel conducting the Brexit negotiations on Gibraltar with Spain, having found out a senior negotiator had gone beyond the democratic mandate set by Cabinet, putting UK sovereignty at risk. The change involved no demotion or longer-term detriment. It was essential to securing a deal with Spain at 1am on New Year’s Eve 2020 – a week after the main UK-EU Free Trade deal was done – and perilously close to a “no deal” for Gibraltar. Nevertheless, Mr Tolley concluded that I had abused my position in relation to that official, having expressed my frustration at the lack of candour I received. He did not conclude it was intentional – which is the legal requirement under the definition of bullying. No-one at the time raised my conduct from the meeting, and no complaint was made until two and a half years later.

The second adverse finding was at the MoJ. The inquiry gave three instances since September 2021, where my feedback to senior civil servants was overly critical, which – however justified – left those concerned feeling insulted. In one example, Mr Tolley concluded I had on occasion said that work lacked “basic information” – no specific dates were given, nor who was offended. In one meeting, he found I had said the department was being “obstructive” on human rights reform, offending one complainant. In the third instance, he concluded – which I deny – that I had said a submission on parole reform was “utterly useless” and “woeful”, offending one complainant.

This is corroborated by the official report. Pretty thin stuff, and I say that as someone he's not a fan of Raab at all.


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I'm glad the people who came forward got some justice - it isn't an easy thing in the civil service.
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