MurraysWorld  >  Archive: News  >  Murray quashes Querrey
Pages: [1] Reply

Murray quashes Querrey

Quote

Andy Murray stuttered awkwardly through the gears, but was victorious over American Sam Querrey, 7-5, 6-3, 6-4 and progresses to the Wimbledon quarter-finals.

After breaking in the fourth game when the clumsy footed Querrey dumped a routine overhead into the net, Murray began to mirror his opponent and suffered mentally, resulting in an ugly first set from both men. As Murray’s first serve deserted him when serving for the set, Querrey broke back in a game peppered with misjudgements.

Querrey doubled faulted yet again, but soon after slapped a forehand down the line which left his Scottish rival stranded, and tied the score at 5-5.  Murray, who has still not lost a set at Wimbledon this year, held serving at a depressing rate of 40% first serves in.

Read more (410 words)

The weight was now on Querrey’s shoulders as he served to stay in the set. The ever present double faults flowed from the racket of 6 foot 6 Querrey, and the hesitant world number 21 slammed a forehand long to hand Murray the set 7-5.

Lacking in matches before Wimbledon, Murray looked comfortable in the first week of the tournament and the feeling continued into the second set. The world number four broke the untidy Querrey with a huge forehand return, later holding for a commanding 4-1 lead in the second set.

Again, it was far from vintage Murray, but the British number one improved steadily and his slice and charges to the net were paying dividends. Whilst serving for the second set, the Dunblane native rarely looked troubled and sealed it with a battering forehand off of a mid court return.

This error strewn encounter upped in quality in the third set, with both men holding serve until a memorable 9th game. Murray showed almost impossible resilience with his defence, retrieving many balls from well behind the baseline.

Gaining numerous break points, the world number four wowed the Centre Court crowd with an impossible forehand winner low to his right and well behind the baseline. Murray’s stubbornness and battling qualities finally told. The decisive break came with a sweeping forehand, looping delicately to the left hand side of the court with Querrey well beaten. Inevitably, the Scot served out with little fuss and was excellent value for his win.

Despite a blemished first hour with inconsistent serving, the British number one never looked like losing to Querrey, who only recently returned from a freak accident in which he fell through a glass table. The last set in particular was magical from Murray, yielding unplayable point construction and astonishing defence.

The beauty in the victory was that Murray was not made to play well until the third set, a staple mark of a true contender for a grand slam. Whilst the likes of Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer are grinding out shaky victories, Murray will be delighted with a fourth straight-sets victory at this year’s Wimbledon. Jo-Wilifred Tsonga is waiting for the 23 year old in the quarter finals in the bottom half of the draw.
[ Last edit by allyh84 July 08, 2010, 10:27 am ] IP Logged
Quote

Just glad that's behind us. Is it just Andy's stubborness that makes his serve percentage dip so low? He could shave several mph off the first serve and become more consistent that way, no?
IP Logged
Quote

Andy Murray stuttered awkwardly through the gears, but was victorious over American Sam Querrey, 7-5, 6-3, 6-4 and progresses to the Wimbledon quarter-finals.

After breaking in the fourth game when the clumsy footed Querrey nervously dumped a routine overhead into the net, Murray began to mirror his opponent and suffered mentally, resulting in an ugly first set from both men. As Murray’s first serve deserted him when serving for the set, Querrey broke back in a game peppered with misjudgements from both men.

Querrey doubled faulted yet again, but soon after slapped a forehand down the line which left his Scottish rival stranded, and tied the score at 5-5.  Murray, who has still not lost a set at Wimbledon this year, held serving at a depressing rate of 40% first serves in.

Read more (410 words)

The weight was now on Querrey’s shoulders as he served to stay in the set. The ever present double faults flowed from the racket of 6 foot 6 Querrey, and the hesitant world number 21 slammed a forehand long to hand Murray the set 7-5.

Lacking in matches before Wimbledon, Murray looked comfortable in the first week of the tournament and the feeling continued into the second set. The world number four broke the untidy Querrey with a huge forehand return, later holding for a commanding 4-1 lead in the second set.

Again, it was far from vintage Murray, but the British number one improved steadily and his slice and charges to the net were paying dividends. Whilst serving for the second set, the Dunblane native rarely looked troubled and sealed it with a battering forehand off of a mid court return.

This error strewn encounter upped in quality in the third set, with both men holding on serve until a memorable 9th game. Murray showed almost impossible resilience with his defence, getting numerous balls back from well behind the baseline.

Gaining numerous break points, the world number four wowed the Centre Court crowd with a forehand winner low to the his right from an impossible location well behind the baseline. Murray’s stubbornness and battling qualities finally told. The decisive break came with a sweeping forehand which looped and dropped delicately to the left hand side of the court, with Querrey well beaten. Inevitably, the Scot served out with little fuss and was excellent value for his win.

Despite a blemished first hour or so with inconsistent serving, the British number one never looked like losing to Querrey, who only recently returned from a freak accident in which he fell through a glass table. The last set in particular was magical from Murray, yielding unplayable point construction and astonishing defence.

The beauty in the victory was that Murray was not made to play well until the third set, a staple mark of a true contender for a grand slam. Whilst the likes of Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer are grinding out shaky victories, Murray will be delighted with a fourth straight-sets victory at this year’s Wimbledon. Jo-Wilifred Tsonga is waiting for the 23 year old in the quarter finals in the bottom half of the draw.

Good report - thanks.

Just glad that's behind us. Is it just Andy's stubborness that makes his serve percentage dip so low? He could shave several mph off the first serve and become more consistent that way, no?

That's certainly what Mac was saying and when he did and placed the ball really well, he aced.


Mod NoticeFixed quote and merged double posts. Please try and avoid double posting, you can edit your original post and add a new quote in those circumstances, thanks.
[ Last edit by Mark June 28, 2010, 07:30 pm ] IP Logged
Quote

Let's hope that scare in the first set was enough to test him, but he didn't exactly look like getting fired up was an issue come the end of the third.
IP Logged
Quote

Really good stuff in the end. Nice to see him come through one or two tricky moments. Obviously some of that fight is coming back, there was no way he was letting Querrey hold at 4-4 in the third lol! Great to see him attacking the short ball a bit more too, shows he is loosening up and getting some of his confidence back.

Bring on Jo Willy! :-)
IP Logged
Quote

I said he would win in 3 he really seems back to his old Ausstralian open self barring the slip in form towards the bend of first/begiing of second set

Bit annoyed that i'll miss the next match and maybe a semi final as well but hopefully he makes it to the final so i can watch him on sunday
IP Logged
Quote

4 down, 3 to go.

Okay, so I was wrong about AR in the final. Still convinced that AM will make it.
IP Logged
Quote

Very fair report Alistair.  Thanks.  Ths was by no means vintage Murray, and at least he acknowledged his 1st set dip in the post-match interview.  Hopefully that's the first and last wobble of the tournament.

Just glad that's behind us. Is it just Andy's stubborness that makes his serve percentage dip so low? He could shave several mph off the first serve and become more consistent that way, no?
Agree.  You don't need to serve super-fast to serve an ace.  In Andy's case placement should take priority over speed.

... he didn't exactly look like getting fired up was an issue come the end of the third.
Maybe because Andy wasn't playing a fired-up opponent.  As McEnroe said at the start of the 3rd, he felt somebody should stick a pin in Querrey to waken him up.  No excuse for the 1st set slump, but sometimes these opponents can be difficult to play, especially if you yourself are a bit off-form.  Seemed to me that Andy finally got his fire going in the 3rd when it really mattered, when Querrey did come alive.   
IP Logged
Quote

 


Mod NoticeFixed quote and merged double posts. Please try and avoid double posting, you can edit your original post and add a new quote in those circumstances, thanks.
[/quote]
Sorry about that. But last time I tried to do that I couldn't work out how to keep the second quote in a box so I had to type in that it was a quote.   
IP Logged
Quote

Sorry about that. But last time I tried to do that I couldn't work out how to keep the second quote in a box so I had to type in that it was a quote.   
Two ways to do it after you have already posted but want to quote another post:

1. Click Quote next to the post > The quote will now appear in the Quick Reply box > copy the quote from the Quick Reply box (highlight the text and right click then hit copy) > edit your last post and paste the where you want.

2. Edit your last post > place the cursor where you want the new quote to be > scroll down (while you remain in the reply page) and you will see a list of previous posts which you can insert.

Hopefully someone of that made sense Smile
IP Logged
Quote

Just glad that's behind us. Is it just Andy's stubborness that makes his serve percentage dip so low? He could shave several mph off the first serve and become more consistent that way, no?


Well said tennis girl, I have been saying for the last 6 months. Go for placement, with some pace, stop blasting it. Guys like Roddick can blast it because they get most first serves in but Andy rarely gets up into the 70% level for first serves and his second serve is not great, Quarrey lacked the ability to exploit it but would Raffa, Soddering or Federer, I doubt it.
IP Logged
Quote

Wasn't that a wonderful volley?

What imagination, I bet there wasn't anyone in the crowd apart from him who was thinking he'd play that shot.
IP Logged
Quote

Two ways to do it after you have already posted but want to quote another post:

1. Click Quote next to the post > The quote will now appear in the Quick Reply box > copy the quote from the Quick Reply box (highlight the text and right click then hit copy) > edit your last post and paste the where you want.

Thanks - have printed out so I have it to hand when I next try this.

2. Edit your last post > place the cursor where you want the new quote to be > scroll down (while you remain in the reply page) and you will see a list of previous posts which you can insert.

Hopefully someone of that made sense Smile

Now my reply has got lost!  Try again:  thanks, have printed out so I have it to hand next time I try as I have a memory like a sieve these days.
IP Logged
Quote

Just glad that's behind us. Is it just Andy's stubborness that makes his serve percentage dip so low? He could shave several mph off the first serve and become more consistent that way, no?


Just seen the highlights of his interview on Wimbledon website, and Andy says he can't play every part of his game good all the time.  On Monday his serving was not the best but his 2nd serve % had improved apparently - I've not seen the stats for that.
IP Logged
Quote

Just seen the highlights of his interview on Wimbledon website, and Andy says he can't play every part of his game good all the time.  On Monday his serving was not the best but his 2nd serve % had improved apparently - I've not seen the stats for that.
Don't know what the stats for his 2nd serve are, but the media are positively purring about this performance and, with England out of the World Cup, attention is, inevitably, focussing fast on Andy as the last Great British Hope.

I think very, very few players are capable of regularly playing every part of their game well all the time - probably only the Federers and Nadals, and even Fed is guilty of some poor play these days, although he probably has an excuse.

Interestingly John McEnroe said after the match that Andy was too hard on himself (well, I think we realise that) and went on to say that even the greatest players don't get things right all of the time, and that Andy should learn to accept that fact and loosen up a bit.
IP Logged
Pages: [1] Reply