Murray calls time early on 2017

By for MurraysWorld.com on
Andy Murray has signalled his intent to sit out the rest of the 2017 ATP season as the hip injury which flared up in his Wimbledon quarterfinal continues to plague him.



In a post on his Instagram account, Murray definitively ruled out his participation in the upcoming Asian swing events in Beijing and Shanghai, before strongly hinting that he would also miss the indoor events in Vienna and Paris that close out the regular season.

Murray won each of these events in 2016, as part of the blistering run of form that swept him to the world number one ranking by the end of the year.

After a 2016 with so many high points for Murray, 2017 has seen a cruel reversal of fortunes as he battled a dip in form, illness and injury.

His sole title of the year came in Dubai in March.

For fans desperate to catch a glimpse of Murray on court this side of Hogmanay, he suggested that he would still be competing at Andy Murray Live in Glasgow in November.

Murray's statement:

Unfortunately, I won’t be able to compete in the upcoming events in Beijing and Shanghai, and most likely, the final two events to finish the season in Vienna and Paris due to my hip injury which has been bothering me the last few months.

Having consulted with a number of leading hip specialists over the last week, along with my own team, we have decided that this is the best decision for my long-term future.

Although this has been a frustrating year on court for many reasons, I’m confident after this extended period of rest and rehabilitation that I will be able to reach my best level again and be competing for Grand Slam titles next season.

I will be beginning my 2018 season in Brisbane in preparation for the Australian Open and I’m looking forward to playing in Glasgow later this year against Roger for UNICEF UK and Sunny-sid3up.

I have a fantastic team working alongside me to help me through this process and appreciate the support from them and all of my fans over this difficult period.
Many thanks for the article, Joe. Let's hope the rest solves the problem. I shall miss him very much but will enjoy watching all those promising young tennis players fight their way up the rankings. Good luck with the recovery Andy and enjoy your time with Kim and the babies.
September 06, 2017, 04:51 PM
By janscribe

Aw man - poor guy.  My heart goes out to him.  However, at least he's being pragmatic and honest with himself.  Really hope to see him competing again next year. 
September 06, 2017, 04:52 PM
By Elly

I'm not surprised at this announcement, my main relief being that he isn't going to have surgery as many had feared.  It is a cruel twist of fate but Andy's made of strong stuff, and as he says, he's got a great team to help him through this, plus he has the birth of their second child to look forward to.  AndyLive too will provide an enjoyable focus for him.  Looking forward to seeing him coming back in January refreshed both physically and mentally and hopefully playing without pain.
September 06, 2017, 09:19 PM
By Aileen

Depressing article by Andrew Castle in today's Metro. He said he "walked like a gorilla" due to chronic hip problems.
September 08, 2017, 08:13 PM
By BigNose

Depressing article by Andrew Castle in today's Metro. He said he "walked like a gorilla" due to chronic hip problems.
I wouldn't pay attention to what Castle has to say because, like the rest of us, he has no idea exactly what the problem is.
September 08, 2017, 10:08 PM
By Aileen

Like Aileen I'm relieved he didn't announce an op.  I think that could well have spelt the end of his playing career and certainly a much longer absence from the tour.  So although my initial reaction was sadness that there will be an Andy-sized hole for the rest of the tennis season and that Andy has had to endure such a dreadful year, my main feeling was of relief.  It had to make sense to take a decent break.  And I take heart from the fact that Anderson, who is a year older than Andy, has said he was warned he might need a hip op but has in fact come back without one and has done better than ever before at USO.
September 09, 2017, 06:55 PM
By Ruthie

And I take heart from the fact that Anderson, who is a year older than Andy, has said he was warned he might need a hip op but has in fact come back without one and has done better than ever before at USO.

It's a good point well made.

Actually since we're nearly mid-September already it's only about 3 and a half months before Andy is due to play in Brisbane. So yes he's having a break but it's not that long really. Just hope rest is all he needs. 
September 09, 2017, 07:13 PM
By BigNose

that's true bignose although it feels like a long time to his fans!   
But remember he hasn't played competitive tennis since Wimbledon so although he was training for USO hopefully that didn't put the recovery back too much.  If rest and rehab aren't all he needs, then I think the prognosis has to be very gloomy.  I think Anderson said he'd been told he'd probably need a year off after an op and no one is willing to predict that an op would be successful, it would seem.
September 09, 2017, 07:18 PM
By Ruthie

that's true bignose although it feels like a long time to his fans!   
But remember he hasn't played competitive tennis since Wimbledon so although he was training for USO hopefully that didn't put the recovery back too much.  If rest and rehab aren't all he needs, then I think the prognosis has to be very gloomy.  I think Anderson said he'd been told he'd probably need a year off after an op and no one is willing to predict that an op would be successful, it would seem.
I doubt Andy would have committed himself to playing in Australia for the next three years if surgery was an imminent option.  Also a lot depends on what the surgery is for because other players, particularly Lleyton Hewitt and Tommy Haas, have had hip surgery and were back playing within months.  In fact the most common hip injury among tennis players is a labral tear (the labrum being mainly the cartilage surrounding the hip joint), and recovery from that usually takes six months.
September 09, 2017, 08:47 PM
By Aileen

I'm not suggesting it's an imminent option Aileen but if the rest and rehab don't do the trick - and given the number of specialists he consulted and the time it's taken to make the decision it seems likely that no one can be sure - then an op is presumably the only other option.  While I'd love to think it could be that kind of swift op, doesn't the fact Andy has said he's been living with a hip problem for years suggest it's more than a tear?  But perhaps you've been researching it Aileen and I have to admit I haven't so I hope you're right!
September 11, 2017, 06:39 PM
By Ruthie

A tear is very easy to diagnose. I've just had one diagnosed. Woman who did the scan told me.
September 11, 2017, 07:15 PM
By blueberryhill

I'm not suggesting it's an imminent option Aileen but if the rest and rehab don't do the trick - and given the number of specialists he consulted and the time it's taken to make the decision it seems likely that no one can be sure - then an op is presumably the only other option.  While I'd love to think it could be that kind of swift op, doesn't the fact Andy has said he's been living with a hip problem for years suggest it's more than a tear?  But perhaps you've been researching it Aileen and I have to admit I haven't so I hope you're right!
I've just done a bit more research into hip problems, particularly in athletes, but some form of hip impingement (please Google it if you want more info) would seem to fit Andy's case, and one which I think that hip specialist, who rather unwisely and unprofessionally, spoke out about after he exited Wimbledon, because that's a deformity of the ball and socket hip joint caused by the socket not developing properly.  The good news is that it can be managed by doing exercises which strengthen the muscles round the hip area, which seems to be exactly what Andy was doing.  Good core strength is also helpful, but Andy's been doing that for quite a while now anyway.  Platelet Rich Plasma therapy (which Rafa had for his knees) can also be effective.  If surgery is required it would take 4-6 months for a sportsman (and men seem to be more prone to this condition than women) to get back to full competition level.

So basically a labral tear is usually an injury caused by over-use of the hip, which is why it's common in tennis players, footballers and rugby players, whereas hip impingement is a pre-existing condition which could be aggravated by playing these sports, although Andy did say before Wimbledon that he'd been told he couldn't cause himself any more damage by playing.

Btw - I understand from what I read in an article by an Aussie sports physio that it was an operation to correct this problem which Tomic had, only I seem to recall at the time that it was said that his hips were so bad it was amazing he'd been able to play at all.  Hewitt on the other hand had one for a labral tear which he'd allowed to get to the stage where it had become career threatening simply because he'd carried on despite the pain.  I do wish some players would realise that pain is there for a reason and that there's nothing heroic about constantly playing through the pain barrier - something Pete Sampras liked to boast about.
September 11, 2017, 09:06 PM
By Aileen

quite
September 16, 2017, 02:37 PM
By BigNose

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